Battle of Corinth

A series of hikes and demonstrations will take place from Saturday through Tuesday for the battle anniversary.

A look back at the Battle of Corinth will bring activities to the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center from Saturday through Tuesday.

On Saturday, activities will include cannon firing demonstrations, ranger-led programs, and a book signing at the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center. Registration is not required for any Saturday program.

Cannon firing demonstrations will take place at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., noon, 1:30 p.m. and 2:30 pm. Each demonstration will introduce visitors to the implements and ordnance used during the war and demonstrate the duties of wartime cannoneers. The 6-pounder field piece will be fired twice during each program.

Several 30-minute ranger led programs will also be offered on Saturday:

10:30 a.m. – Daniel Murray of the 1st U.S. Infantry Join Daniel Murray, and Irish immigrant soldier, as he describes his life in the Regular Army during the war.

11:30 a.m. – Battery Robinett. On October 4, 1862, the small earthen redoubt known as Battery Robinett was the focus of three attacks by Confederate infantry and dismounted cavalry.

2 p.m. – Civil War Nurse: Kate Cumming. A young woman from Mobile, Alabama, travelled to Corinth and tended the wounded of both sides.

3 p.m. – Battery Robinett.

At noon, author John E. Talbot will sign copies of his new work “Recollections of Thomas D. Duncan, A Confederate Soldier” in the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center. Thomas Duncan was a local resident of Corinth, and his knowledge of the area was instrumental in selecting the location of the “Beauregard Line” of fortifications. Before the war ended, Duncan took part in 53 battles and other engagements.

Talbot will also sign his book at the Shiloh National Military Park bookstore from 1 to 3 p.m. on Sunday.

The following ranger-led programs will be offered:

Sunday, Oct. 3

10 a.m. – John McArthur and the Fighting on the Union Left Flank – Meet at the visitor center for a car caravan and short walks. Brigadier General John MacArthur began the battle without an assignment. Early in the morning of October 3rd he was given command of a brigade and by noon he was leading three brigades in the greatest showing of his military career. Ranger Tom Parson will lead a driving tour to Alexander’s Crossroads and then return to Corinth with stops at Cane’s Creek, Oliver’s Hill and Battery F.

11 a.m. – Battery Robinett. Meet at the visitor center desk for a 100-yard hike on a grassy slope. On October 4, 1862, the small earth redoubt known as Battery Robinett was the focus of three attacks by Confederate infantry and dismounted cavalry. Located on high ground at the center of the Union’s defensive line, Battery Robinett was key to a Confederate victory and the intensity of the fighting left the area covered with the dead and wounded of both armies. Join Ranger Matt McMillen for an in-depth look at the heaviest fighting in the largest battle in the state of Mississippi.

1 p.m. – Daniel Murray of the 1st U.S. Infantry. Meet at the visitor center desk for an easy 100-yard hike on a grassy slope. Join Daniel Murray, an Irish immigrant and American soldier, as he describes his life in the Regular Army at the outbreak of the war through the fighting at Battery Robinett. Prior to the Civil War, Daniel served in Indian Territory and later fought at the Battle of Wilson’s Creek, Missouri. During the Battle of Corinth, he was one of 26 men from Company C, 1st U.S. Infantry, who were manning the heavy artillery inside of Battery Robinett. Join Ranger Tom Parson for the first-person experience.

2 to 4 p.m. – Davies’ Thin Blue Line. Meet at the interpretive center for a car caravan. On the morning of October 3rd Brigadier General Thomas Davies was sent forward by Major General William Rosecrans with confusing orders and 1,500 men to hold the Union right against an attack by Confederate Major General Sterling Price’s Army of the West with 9,000 men. Overwhelmed at the old Confederate earthworks, Davies would pull back to the White House line to make a stand. Aided by hard fighting, intense heat, and Confederate command confusion, Davies’ men would hold until relieved at 4:30 p.m.

During this stand Brigadier General Charles Hamilton would have a perfect opportunity to attack the exposed Confederate left flank. Due to a series of confused orders and Hamilton’s lack of initiative, the attack would be bungled and occur too late. The car caravan led by Ranger Charlie Spearman will travel to the site of the Confederate earthworks of the old Beauregard Line and the site of the fighting at the White House fields.

2:30 p.m. – Civil War Nurse: Kate Cumming. Meet at the visitor center for a 100-yard, easy hike. Her unique insight and experiences were recorded faithfully in her diary. Join Ranger Ansley Moore for a glimpse into the life of this remarkable woman.

3:30 p.m. – Battery Robinett. Meet at the visitor center desk.

Monday, Oct. 4

9:30 a.m. – Battery Robinett. Meet at the visitor center desk.

10:30 a.m. – Battery Powell and the Confederate Breakthrough. Meet at the visitor center desk for a 1-mile hike on a grassy slope, paved streets and sidewalks. Join Ranger Tom Parson for a walk that will focus on the Confederate attack on Davies’ Division and the breaking of the Federal line at Battery Powell. Details will include the attack of Green’s Division and the breakthrough at Battery Powell; the collapse of DuBois’s line; street to street fighting; the Confederates reach the railroad crossroads; the flank attack of the 5th Minnesota. The walk will begin at the visitor center, proceed to the site of Battery Powell, turn south and walk through the historic district to Trailhead Park. Visitors will then have the option of returning to the interpretive center or visiting the Depot Museum or the Coca-Cola Museum.

1:30 p.m. – Lt. Charles Labuzan at Battery Robinett. Meet at the visitor center desk for a 100-yard, easy hike. The Confederate assaults against Battery Robinett were unparalleled in their ferocity. Lt. Charles Labuzan of the 42nd Alabama Infantry wrote a graphic description of his experience on the slope in front of the fort. Left in a precarious position on the field between the second and third attacks he saw his comrades cut down around him. “Oh God, I have never seen the like, the men fell like grass.” Join Ranger Timothy Arnold for an exciting account of that tragic morning.

2 p.m. – Battery Robinett. Meet at Battery Robinett.

2:30 p.m. – Daniel Murray of the 1st U.S. Infantry. Meet at Battery Robinett.

Tuesday, Oct. 5

9:30 a.m. – Davis Bridge and Young’s Bridge. Meet at the interpretive center for a 35-mile car caravan. The hike is short distances of easy walking.

On the morning of October 5, a small Confederate force which had been left behind to guard wagons was met at the Hatchie River by two brigade of Union infantry and artillery. The Federals were on their way to reenforce the garrison at Corinth and ended up blocking Van Dorn’s retreat. This car caravan will make stops at the site of Van Dorn’s camps in Chewalla, the site of Young’s Bridge on the Tuscumbia River, Metamora Ridge, and site of Davis Bridge on the Hatchie River. Join Ranger Tom Parson and learn of the final engagement of the Corinth campaign.

2 p.m. – Battery Robinett. Meet at the visitor center desk.

All tours are free and open to the public.

Staff Writer

Jebb Johnston is a 1991 Alcorn Central High School graduate and a 1995 Ole Miss journalism graduate. His primary beats are city and county government.

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