With a large amount of new funds coming into the district, Corinth School District leaders are getting ready to find the best ways to use it.

The district will see some increases in regular state funding along with the almost $10 million coming to the district through the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund.

“If a district thinks through this before they jump out and do a lot of things, it really could have not just an immediate effect these next three school years, it could have a long-term effect,” Superintendent Lee Childress told the board of trustees Thursday evening. “It’s an opportunity that doesn’t come along very often.”

ESSER is not going to allow construction projects for general maintenance. Teachers and staff have submitted lists of equipment and supplies that they would like to see purchased.

A work session may be forthcoming for the board to dive into the possible expenditures and explore how to use the ESSER funds in a way that will allow for district funds.

The relief funds have tiered spending deadlines over the next few years ending in September 2024.

State funding for the district will increase about $579,000 overall, Childress said. The district is getting a Chickasaw Cession allocation of $397,041.34, an increase of about $23,000 from last year.

The district will receive about $220,000 for the teacher and teacher assistant pay raise.

Staff Writer

Jebb Johnston is a 1991 Alcorn Central High School graduate and a 1995 Ole Miss journalism graduate. His primary beats are city and county government.

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