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Artists present contrasting visions
by Jebb Johnston
Jul 16, 2014 | 49 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Fred Asbury and Patty Simon show a couple of their favorites from the current exhibit at the Corinth Artist Guild Gallery. An opening reception is today from 5 to 7 p.m. / Staff photo by Jebb Johnston
Fred Asbury and Patty Simon show a couple of their favorites from the current exhibit at the Corinth Artist Guild Gallery. An opening reception is today from 5 to 7 p.m. / Staff photo by Jebb Johnston
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While she loves detail, he can’t get enough of the abstract.

The contrasting artistic visions of Fred Asbury and Patty Simon, who are currently building a studio near Walnut, are now featured at the Corinth Artist Guild Gallery. An opening reception is today from 5 to 7 p.m., and the exhibit runs through July 31.

The residents of Bartlett, Tenn., want to base their Camp Hill Fine Arts at a wooded patch of land 5 miles west of Walnut.

“It’s going to be a teaching facility,” said Asbury. “We’re going to want to do classes with individuals to start with and then expand that into small groups. We eventually want to have an art center there, like an artist retreat.”

While Simon uses colored pencil, Asbury is passionate about computer-generated digital art and abstract expressionism. His works sometimes begin with focusing on a small section of a photograph and beginning to manipulate it.

He describes the computer-generated art as a new medium.

“Artists never got into it until recently, in the last 10 years,” said Asbury. “In Europe, this is just booming. We’re doing abstract expressionism, but we’re exploring a whole new medium, a whole new world … a whole new universe, for that matter.”

This is the gallery’s first exhibit putting digital fine art in the spotlight.

Minimalists are a big influence on the approach of Asbury, who also enjoys photography, drawing with ebony pencil and painting with acrylics.

Simon enjoys the control of the image that she can achieve with colored pencil.

“Almost everything I do has a lot of detail,” she said. “Colored pencil kind of leans that way.”

A few of her exhibited pieces incorporate a bit of watercolor, but the majority are exclusively colored pencil.

“She gets so much out of the colored pencil that it seems almost impossible,” said Guild President Sonny Boatman. “He has provided some very exciting patterns and statements with the digital fine art, but he also has some black and white abstract drawings that are very powerful.”

The gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday at 609 Fillmore. Call 665-0520 for more information.
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