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Homeowner finds thousands of bees in attic
by Zack Steen
Apr 02, 2014 | 144 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Downtown Corinth homeowner Stuart Green watches his workers tear apart his home on Taylor Street. Several thousand bees had made his attic, wall and floor their home.
Downtown Corinth homeowner Stuart Green watches his workers tear apart his home on Taylor Street. Several thousand bees had made his attic, wall and floor their home.
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The honey bee normally nests inside a hollow tree, but occasionally they’ll use a wall or attic space inside a house as a nesting site. The insect can find their way into a home through the smallest crack. A bee only needs an eighth of an inch hole to get inside.

Downtown Corinth homeowners Stuart and Nan Green have first hand knowledge of the honey bee. The couple and their three children have been living with bees in their attic for more than 10 years.

“We first started noticing bees swarming around outside,” said Stuart. “We have hundreds of bees, maybe even thousands flying in and out of our house just about everyday.”

Stuart said the bees have not gotten into the his home on Taylor Street, but he feels like it could happen at anytime.

“I’ve been looking for someone that does bee removal, but just haven’t had any luck ... until now,” he said. “Thank goodness for Craigslist.”

Members of the Savannah Area Beekeepers Association, bee keeper friends Randall Sharp and Danielle Cook are two West Tennessee natives in search of free bees and their honey.

“We don’t charge a thing to remove bees,” said Sharp. “We just want to keep the bees and honey. We got about 30,000 bees out of a trailer home last week – that was the hardest bee removal job we’ve done so far.”

The couple felt like the Green’s house might contain even more bees.

“Knowing that Stuart has been seeing them for 10 years, means there’s a big hive in those walls,” said Sharp. “Honey bees will send scouts out in the spring time searching for places to setup camp. It doesn’t take long for them to find a good place and sometimes it’s inside a home.”

On Monday, Stuart had workers remove layers of sliding and shingles from his family’s home. Underneath they found hives and combs across the attic ceiling and between the wall.

“The bee keepers followed the path and finally found the active hive between the second and third floors of the home,” said Stuart. “We ended up having to go inside the house. We had to pull floor boards up in one of the rooms.”

Stuart said the area between two floor joists was jam packed with comb and honey.

“They ended up getting two five gallon buckets of comb and honey out of my floor,” he added.

The bee keepers found and removed the queen and the several thousands of bees living in the Green’s home. All honey and comb was removed and a disinfectant solution was sprayed to hopefully keep bees from returning.

Stuart said only two people suffered bee stings during the removal.

“This whole experience has been pretty amazing. I am very surprised at how it all worked out,” Stuart said. “I thought it would be a lot scarier then it was.”
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