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Saddling up to raise money for the museum
by Steve Beavers
Nov 14, 2013 | 51 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Local photographer Bill Avery captured the everyday life of a cowboy during a shoot in October. The photographer will be presenting the photographs taken during a three-week trip out West during a slideshow to raise funds for the Crossroads Museum.
Local photographer Bill Avery captured the everyday life of a cowboy during a shoot in October. The photographer will be presenting the photographs taken during a three-week trip out West during a slideshow to raise funds for the Crossroads Museum.
slideshow
A local photographer is saddling up to help the Crossroads Museum.

Bill Avery will be sharing a slideshow from a three-week trek out West in effort to raise money for the museum.

"I thought this could be a good starting ground to raise funds for a museum project and also share the images Vicki and I took during our three-week excursion," said Avery.

Avery will show around 180 photos during the slideshow on Nov. 18 at 6:30 p.m. The event will be held at the museum with donations accepted.

The Avery's trip in October encompassed six states and 3,000 miles.

"A bulk of the photos will be from our stay at the Hideout Ranch that borders Yellowstone National Park," said the photographer. "We got back into areas you can't see from a road."

Located in Shell, Wyoming, the Hideout is a 300,000 acre ranch limited to 25 guests per week.

"It was a good shoot with lots of color," added Avery. "The ranch had some of the most rugged and beautiful terrain visible off the beaten path."

Avery will present the program in two segments on a large screen television. In the first segment, 140 photos are slated to be shown to music. Segment two will cover the remaining 40 slides. The whole program should last around 40-45 minutes, according to the photographer.

"Vicki and I have traveled abroad the past several years, but we decided to stay home this year and visit some states not previously traveled," said Avery. "We hope the public will enjoy seeing some beautiful areas not seen before."

Led by professional photographer Joseph Van Os, the photo safari provided some early mornings and late nights. Scenes involving wild mustangs and cowboy life make up a majority of the photographs.

"The life there reminded me of my younger days of watching westerns," said the photographer. "The day began well before daylight and ended after sunset."
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