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Running afoul of TV language
by Lora Ann Huff
Jul 26, 2013 | 0 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The other night when I turned on the TV after having watched the network news a while before, a sitcom which I had not seen before was coming on. The time was probably 7:30, not sure, but it was definitely early enough children could have been flipping channels and come across this show.

Before the name of the show or the actors’ names came up, the dialogue began. The first six sentences contained words my generation’s kids were forbidden to say, and most didn’t even hear until long after they started school. The attitudes expressed were also terrible.

I’m not even sure what the show’s name was – I just know the intro was disgusting. I didn’t care to watch any more to see if the plot made sense or the language got better.

I try to ignore a lot of today’s cruddy portrayals so I won’t have negative attitudes about everything, but just a tidbit of that show gave me a really sad feeling about what our little kids are up against every day.

I heard one young parent say recently that her children like to watch the comedy shows on TV Land, but she has to monitor the commercials because there are certain verbal expressions her kids don’t need to hear and repeat at their young age.

Thinking back to the days of censorship in broadcasting, I remember the comfort we felt in knowing certain things would not be said or done until at least the late night hours. As far as I can tell, there is no secure time today. Everything is about free press and free speech, forgetting we have young minds and hearts to train and groom for decent living in the future.

My mother had a remedy for foul language – and it wasn’t soap! However, the sad thing is that words she considered “foul” when I was a kid are so very mild compared to the crude words today. It’s just sad and that’s about all I can say.

…So we monitor and we edit and we try to guide the little ones along the lines of what is acceptable and respectful. There is a right way to talk – and we don’t need to follow the examples portrayed on television.

(Lora Ann Huff is a Wenasoga resident and special columnist for the Daily Corinthian. Her column appears Friday. She may be reached at 1774 CR 700, Corinth, MS 38834.)
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