Contact Us e-Edition Crossroads Magazine
Provide a bang, not a burn
by Jebb Johnston
Jul 03, 2013 | 56 views | 0 0 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
TNT Fireworks sellers April Wilbanks (left) and Samantha Null prepare for a long work day on Independence Day. Located just east of Corinth on U.S. 72, the TNT Fireworks stand opens today at 8 a.m.
TNT Fireworks sellers April Wilbanks (left) and Samantha Null prepare for a long work day on Independence Day. Located just east of Corinth on U.S. 72, the TNT Fireworks stand opens today at 8 a.m.
slideshow
Many fireworks are flying off the shelves and into the hands of children this week.

That combination is one in which safety shouldn’t be overlooked, officials caution.

As always, Corinth officials remind residents that the use of fireworks is illegal in the city limits, although they typically are used throughout the city around Independence Day and New Year’s.

While rain is in the forecast, conditions have begun to lean towards dry in the days leading up to July 4.

“It is getting a little dry, even though we’ve had some rain recently,” said Ricky Gibens, county fire coordinator. “I would encourage people to stay away from residential areas and fields with tall grass. Open asphalt and dirt would be the best places.”

It’s best to have a garden hose and a bucket of water handy, he said.

Gibens also advises to follow the directions on the packaging of fireworks and to provide adult supervision when fireworks are in the hands of youngsters.

“Enjoy yourself but do it safely,” he said.

Statistics show why it is important: The Fourth of July is the single day with the most fires every year — double that of an average day — and fireworks account for 40 percent of those fires, according to the National Fire Protection Association.

According to the state fire marshal’s office, the period of June 29 to July 9, 2012, had 56 fires caused by fireworks. No one was injured.

“Be sure to use common sense when handling any type of fireworks,” said Fire Marshal Mike Chaney, “and be especially cautious where young children are concerned, as statistics show children ages 5 to 9 and teens 15 to 19 are two times more at risk for injury.”

As an alternative to using consumer fireworks, officials encourage people to consider attending a public fireworks display.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet