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Death Notices for Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014
Oct 22, 2014 | 220 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Acklee Clay Acklee Clay died on Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014, in Chicago, Ill. A graveside service will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday at Spence Cemetery. Willie Sorrell Willie K. Sorrell died at his residence on Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014. Timothy Duckworth Funeral services for Timothy O’Neal Duckworth, 43, of Iuka are set for 12:30 p.m. Friday at Mission of Hope with burial in Forrest Memorial Park. Visitation is from 11 a.m. until service time. Mr. Duckworth died Monday, Oct. 20, 2014, at North Mississippi Medical Center in Tupelo. Jane Shipman Jane Mildred Shipman, 91, of Corinth died Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, at Mississippi Care Center. A memorial service will be held a later date. Gary Raymond Perkins Funeral services for Gary Raymond Perkins, 72, of Corinth, are set for 2 p.m. today at McPeters Inc. Funeral Directors Chapel with Tim West and David Fisher officiating. Visitation is from 1 p.m. until service time today. Mr. Perkins died Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, at Baptist Memorial Hospital-DeSoto. Marion Robertson BOONEVILLE — Marion Danny Robertson, 61, died Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014, at his home in the Blackland community. He was born in Logan County, Kentucky, February 21, 1953 to Marion Henry and Virginia Louise Robertson. He was diesel motor mechanic and a Baptist. Mr. Robertson was cremated and a memorial service will be held later by the family. Mary Garrett Taylor Mary Garrett Taylor, 104, died Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, in Florence, Ala. Visitation will be held on Friday, Oct. 24 at Tate Baptist Church, 1201 North Harper Road in Corinth, from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m., with a service to follow at 11:30 a.m. A private family graveside service will be held at Henry Cemetery.
Aldermen reject zoning variance for vet office
by Zack Steen
Oct 22, 2014 | 22 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Neighbors spoke out against the opening of a veterinary clinic on Shiloh Road during Tuesday night’s meeting of the Board of Aldermen. Corinth realtor Judy Glenn represented current property owner Bob and Wanda Crowe and prospective property buyer Kay Jobe, who was requesting a zoning variance for the residential property. “We want permission to allow this property, which has always been used for business purposes, to continue being used for business purposes,” said Glenn. “We went through the statutory process, we gave notice and gained the unanimous recommendation from the Board of Adjustment and Planning Commission to allow a small animal clinic to operate.” The property, located at 1600 Shiloh Road and extending back to Sixth Street, was operated as a dental clinic for 40 years, however it has sat vacant for the last several years. “I am concerned about outdoor kennels,” said James Daniel, who lives across the street from the property. “I understand Dr. Jobe said she would not kennel dogs, but I can’t help thinking that her business will grow and in five years she’ll want to kennel dogs.” The property is currently zoned as R-2 multi-family residential. The variance request would rezone the property to C-1 commercial. “It is my opinion they want to use a skirt-around to rezone the property to create a C-1 island in the middle of a residential neighborhood,” said John Frame, who lives within eyesight of the property. “The board has said they do not want to set a precedent of rezoning properties through variances, so my question is why even consider this one?” A third neighbor who lives adjacent to the office property brought property value concerns and possible traffic issues to the board. Glenn said if the property could not be rezoned as C1, the owners' only other option would be to market the property as a duplex. “I wonder would neighbors rather have several renters with two or three cars apiece or a reasonable small business owner next door?” she said. Jobe promised the board she would never board animals on the property. “I will have to occasionally keep an animal overnight if they are sick or injured,” the veterinarian said. “I respect my neighbors where I live, and I would do the same with the neighbors of my business.” Alderman J.C. Hill said he had heard from eight to 10 people who asked him to vote against the rezoning, while aldermen Michael McFall and Chip Wood agreed if neighbors didn’t want it, they couldn’t vote for it. “We talk about commercial versus residential, but I think the real concern is with the animals,” Wood said. “These residents do not want a vet next to their house ... period.” The board voted 5-0, with one alderman not casting a vote, to not allow the variance. Jobe had previously attempted to open a veterinary clinic in the former Dr. Bob Davis medical office on Cass Street. That property's zoning would have allowed the clinic, but unhappy homeowners in the adjacent Bunch Street townhouses kept Jobe from opening a clinic in that location.
Staff photo by Zack Steen
Volunteer Janice Knighton talks with sixth graders from Biggersville Elementary School about the Verandah Curlee House during Wednesday's annual LINK Architectural Discovery Walk.
Staff photo by Zack Steen Volunteer Janice Knighton talks with sixth graders from Biggersville Elementary School about the Verandah Curlee House during Wednesday's annual LINK Architectural Discovery Walk.
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Tours link students with the past
by Zack Steen
Oct 22, 2014 | 5 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Staff photo by Zack Steen
Volunteer Janice Knighton talks with sixth graders from Biggersville Elementary School about the Verandah Curlee House during Wednesday's annual LINK Architectural Discovery Walk.
Staff photo by Zack Steen Volunteer Janice Knighton talks with sixth graders from Biggersville Elementary School about the Verandah Curlee House during Wednesday's annual LINK Architectural Discovery Walk.
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Students from area schools flooded downtown Corinth on Wednesday for LINK’s annual Architectural Discovery Walk. More than 250 sixth graders from Corinth Middle School, Alcorn Central Middle School, Biggersville Elementary School and Rienzi Elementary School learned about the past while on a ten stop tour of historical landmarks around city. “The discovery walk is a great way to introduce school children to our beautiful, historic downtown area,” said volunteer coordinator Cody Daniel. “The volunteers, dressed in 19th and 20th century attire, were at each stop to talk to the kids about the historic sites.” Volunteer Janice Knighton was stationed at the Verandah Curlee House for her third annual discovery walk. “I love doing this -- dressing up and talking to the kids about a house I love so much,” said Knighton. “The kids have been really interested this year. Each group has asked several really good questions.” Volunteers and sites also included Ed Lucas at Waits' Jewelry, Betsy and Beth Whitehurst at Biggers Hardware and the old Liddon bank, Brandy Steen at the historic Corinth Coliseum, William McMullin at the Waldron Street Christian Church, Sue Smith at the Alcorn County Courthouse, Dave Jennings at Borroum’s Drug Store, Bobby Marolt at the chancery building, Sonny Boatman at the Corinth Artist Guild Gallery and Becky Williams at Fillmore Street Chapel. “We have a lot of people in the community who not only know the history of Corinth, but they are also willing to take the time to share it with our area’s children,” added Daniel. “Several high school students volunteered as tour guides, which helped tremendously.” Other adult volunteers were Autry Davis, Laura Gilham and Jim Gilham. Student volunteers from Biggersville High School were Savannah Gray, Whitney Brooks, Lucy Lawson, Taylor Beth Nash, Kaylin Parvin, Kimberly Michael, Anna Michael and Hailey Troxell. LINK, the Healthy Communities/Healthy Youth Initiative of Corinth and Alcorn County, administers programs for students in grades K-6 with funding assistance from the Benjamin and Corinne Pierce Foundation, Corinth Alcorn Reaching for Excellence (C.A.R.E.), Mississippi Arts Commission and Toyota. Coca-Cola, McAlister’s Deli and United Print Services donated items for the discovery walk. (Individuals wishing to volunteer with LINK should contact, linkcorinthalcorn@gmail.com or visit linkcorinthalcorn.org.)
Veterans service officer to step down next spring
by Jebb Johnston
Oct 22, 2014 | 13 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Alcorn County Veterans Service Office is beginning to prepare for a possible change in leadership. Veterans Service Officer Pat Ray told the Board of Supervisors this week that she will be looking at resigning around April or May because of health complications. “We have got to have a certified officer to keep the door open,” she said. Ray received the board’s approval to send one of the office’s employees, Jill Bascomb, to Mississippi State Veterans Affairs training to obtain certification so that she will be prepared to step into the leadership role if needed. “I’m just trying to get us a back-up plan,” she said. Bascomb, who also works for 911, is a veteran who served a year in Kuwait and has been well-received at the veterans service office, said Ray. In other business before county supervisors: • The board agreed to participate in the Tombigbee River Valley Water Management District’s “Match the Beaver” program, which provides for beaver control and has been expanded to also include feral hogs. The county will pay $7,500, with half of that to be reimbursed by TRVWMD. Feral hogs are increasing in number in Alcorn County. “They’re tough out on Hatchie. They’re destructive,” said Joe Duncan, a member of the Hatchie drainage district board. • The board also reappointed Danny Timmons to the tourism board for a restaurant seat that is jointly appointed with the Corinth Board of Mayor and Aldermen. • Sheriff Charles Rinehart reported total September revenue of $478,533.47. • The board voted to reject bids and re-advertise on the Ayrshire property improvements.
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