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Sharing Hearts volunteer Teresa Tennyson helps Bob Foster fill a hygiene bag which is being donated to AMEN Food Pantry.
Sharing Hearts volunteer Teresa Tennyson helps Bob Foster fill a hygiene bag which is being donated to AMEN Food Pantry.
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Bids for street upgrades unsealed
by Jebb Johnston
Jul 27, 2016 | 379 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Cook Coggin Engineers unsealed bids Tuesday for the city’s Meigg Street sidewalk and lighting project. The low bid appears to be favorable for the project to move forward. The engineering firm will review the bids and present them to the Board of Mayor and Aldermen in an upcoming meeting for consideration. The apparent low bidder is J.M. Duncan, Inc., of Falkner, at $592,872.35. The engineering estimate for the project is $600,000. The city was awarded Transportation Alternative Program funds in 2014 toward the project, which will create an improved pedestrian corridor leading to the park. It includes 4,100 feet between Cass Street and South Parkway with removal and replacement of existing sidewalks and the installation of attractive pole lighting along the route. Most of the walking route will be on the south side of Meigg Street, although it will shift to the north side of Meigg Street from Penn to Cass. Ramps compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act will be installed along the route and at select intersections to permit access to areas north of Meigg Street. Driveways along the route will be reworked as required to assure that the sidewalk route does not have excessive side slopes. Signage and striping will be installed as required. Three other contractors submitted bids: Prairie Construction, LLC, of Tupelo - $608,856.75; Worsham Brothers, Inc., of Corinth - $610,000; and Colom Construction Company, Inc., of Ripley - $718,904.25.
Project gives sense of accomplishment
by Steve Beavers
Jul 27, 2016 | 366 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Sharing Hearts volunteer Teresa Tennyson helps Bob Foster fill a hygiene bag which is being donated to AMEN Food Pantry.
Sharing Hearts volunteer Teresa Tennyson helps Bob Foster fill a hygiene bag which is being donated to AMEN Food Pantry.
slideshow
Sharing Hearts had the assembly line going. Participants and volunteers of the non-profit center were working together to help the AMEN Food Pantry. Around 24 hygiene bags were put together during the annual Tuesday meeting of the daycare center for people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or any other form of dementia. “This is for them to get a sense of accomplishment of helping someone,” said Sharing Hearts Program Director Melinda Grady of the five participants who helped with the project. The bags contained toothpaste, toothbrushes, soap, shampoo, comb, deodorant and body wash. “Tuesdays are special here,” said Grady of the program held at First Baptist Church. “Caregivers are magically transformed into normal people while their loved ones are cared for at Sharing Hearts.” Sharing Hearts meets from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The program is designed to offer caregivers a day of rest and their family members a day of caring supervision. Participants are treated to music, games, lunch, exercise and crafts designed to entertain and provide social interaction. “We survive off grants and donations,” added Grady. Each Tuesday begins at First Baptist in the Sunday School room just off the courtyard on Fillmore Street. A small snack is followed by a devotional and music. “Music is very important in our program because the part of the brain were music is stored is one of the last areas affected by dementia,” said Grady. Participants are involved in games and chair exercises following music time. After lunch, the group has a quiet time in which they can watch DVDs of “The Andy Griffith Show” or “I Love Lucy.” “We will occasionally have afternoon entertainment,” added Grady. “We feel participants benefit from a slower tempo as the day comes to an end so they can go home relaxed and calm.” A trained staff of caring volunteers work one-on-one with each participant. All activities are geared toward them and none are made to comply if they are not interested. “We want to give them as much love and entertainment so they can have a fun day,” said Grady, who has been the director since 2014. “We are here to help the caregiver and their loved one as much as we can.” (For more information about Sharing Hearts, contact Melinda Grady at 662-808-2206.)
District approves policy changes
by Jebb Johnston
Jul 27, 2016 | 981 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The number of credits required for graduation for incoming Corinth High School students is increasing. It is one of a few policy changes approved last week by the Corinth School District Board of Trustees. Incoming freshmen will need to earn a total of 27 credits. The number increases to 28 for students entering high school in the 2017-2018 academic year and 29 for students entering in 2018-2019. Students in 10th, 11th and 12th grade in the coming school year are not affected. The change comes as a result of increasing opportunities to earn credits prior to high school. “We presently have some students that this year left the middle school within the neighborhood of five or six credits,” said Superintendent Lee Childress. “The state passed a provision that allows you to begin to award credit in seventh and eighth grade for any courses in which you are teaching the same content in a high school-level class, which opens up some additional opportunities.” With an expanded list of electives, “We’ve really opened up what you can do at the middle school,” he said. Speech — a new requirement — and drama are among the offerings. Students will be able to leave the middle school with as much as 12 credits. Beginning with this year’s incoming high school class, students will also be required to take a math and a science during their senior year. “There is a body of research out there that says seniors that take those classes do better when they get to college, do better on the ACT, and we need to move our children in that direction,” said Childress. The board also approved a handbook revision that tightens restrictions on cell phone usage. “It says the cell phone cannot be out in the classroom during the academic day. In the hallway or at lunch is fine,” the superintendent said.
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