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Historic paint finish consultant Matthew J. Mosca obtains a paint sample from a surface in the Verandah-Curlee House. His findings will help guide the interior restoration.
Historic paint finish consultant Matthew J. Mosca obtains a paint sample from a surface in the Verandah-Curlee House. His findings will help guide the interior restoration.
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City hears four-way stop concerns
by Jebb Johnston
Oct 25, 2014 | 6 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Concerns about the new four-way stop at Fillmore Street and Third Street came before the latest meeting of the Board of Aldermen. Motorists have regularly been failing to stop at the intersection. “I have three small children, and we’ve got to slow it down on Fillmore Street coming into town,” said concerned resident Russell Smith. “I know it’s a thoroughfare to get downtown from Shiloh Road, but if we don’t slow it down through there, people are going to die. We’ve got to do something.” Lack of visibility of the signs was partly blamed for the problem. The street department planned to do some tree trimming and also to relocate some of the signs which were found to be either too close to the sidewalk or too far from the street according to regulations. “The trees that are between the sidewalk and the street throughout our downtown add a great deal of charm to Corinth,” said Street Commissioner Philip Verdung, “but it also makes seeing signs difficult at times, and it makes it difficult for us to adhere to regulation and also make sure that the signs are perfectly visible to everyone.” He said the changes should help, but visibility may still be somewhat of an issue. Verdung discussed adding some temporary signage to call attention to the stop, and Police Chief David Lancaster said his department would put a patrolman in the area to stop some motorists and help increase awareness of the new stop. Also, the proposed five-way stop at Hickory and Poplar is on hold for now.
Man uncovers layers of history
by Jebb Johnston
Oct 25, 2014 | 2 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Historic paint finish consultant Matthew J. Mosca obtains a paint sample from a surface in the Verandah-Curlee House. His findings will help guide the interior restoration.
Historic paint finish consultant Matthew J. Mosca obtains a paint sample from a surface in the Verandah-Curlee House. His findings will help guide the interior restoration.
slideshow
Like a detective probing forensic clues, Matthew J. Mosca spent the past week examining peeling paint and bits of plaster to uncover the original colors and wood finishes of the Verandah-Curlee House interior. His observations, combined with laboratory analysis, will be compiled in a report to be submitted to the Siege and Battle of Corinth Commission in February to guide the interior restoration of the home. A historic paint finishes consultant with more than 30 years of experience, Mosca did paint investigations for Mt. Vernon, Carnton Plantation near Franklin, Tenn., and Carter House. During the summer, he investigated the original colors for the U.S. ambassador’s home in Paris. In the parlor of the Verandah-Curlee House, which he described as “the most elaborate and interesting room” with its intricate plasterwork, he found the predominant colors to be white and pale gray with some possible wallpapering of recessed panels. Different types of paints were used through the years. The oldest is water soluble, and he also found zinc oxide white on some of the parlor surfaces. “It was highly prized just about the time that this house was built,” said Mosca. “It was a relatively new pigment that came on the market and became popular for two reasons — one, it was not poisonous the way lead white was, and it was a brighter white. It was considered more fashionable, more desirable.” One splash of color he uncovered in the parlor is the ceiling medallion, which appeared to have a light yellow color. The 1929 renovations by the Curlee family appear to have included a dado treatment and some additional moldings. He examined the original plaster underneath in the dining room, finding “what appears to be a light gray water soluble paint, which was very popular in the 19th century for plaster, and that may be the original finish,” said Mosca. “It’s also entirely possible that it’s not from the war era, but from after, and that this room might have been wallpapered.” The different layers and the passage of time will pose some restoration challenges. “The house evidently was closed up for 20 years without heat, and one of the results of that is the paints are failing on these plaster surfaces because the water soluble paint, which is the earliest one, is also the most fragile type of finish,” said Mosca. “Later on, it was painted with oil-based paints, which is never a good idea, and then latex on top of that. Because of the incompatibilities of these materials, there’s a lot of shrinking and tensions that have built up in the paint layers.” In some areas, the paint has crazed, resulting in a cracked pattern like very dry earth. “At least in the case of the medallion, I have been able to remove the layers quite easily,” said Mosca. “But on the walls, on the tablature, what’s happening is that the face of the plaster is being pulled away by the tension. And while it’s not a problem for flat surfaces, it means quite a bit of restoration will have to take place for the cast plaster.” With micro-chemical testing, Mosca can identify the constituents of paint finishes. He examines pigments using polarized light and UV fluorescent microscopy. Visiting Corinth for the first time, Mosca said he found the Verandah-Curlee House to be an impressively and thoughtfully designed structure with an interesting story to tell. He is based in Baltimore, Maryland.
Drive underway for coats, food, toys
by Kimberley Shelton
Oct 25, 2014 | 0 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Spreading the true message of the holiday season, Cash Express is once again taking up donations for those in need. “You can help us bless needy families in our community by donating canned foods, new toys and new or used coats during our 10th annual Toy and Coat Drive this Christmas season,” said Amy Smith of Corinth Cash Express. “We ask that all donations be received by Dec.15 in order to have them delivered in time for Christmas.” Used coats will be cleaned by Corinth Dry Cleaners. Items can be dropped off at Cash Express (1113 Highway 72 East), Roger’s Supermarket, Sonic Drive-In, Pathway Christian Academy, Casabella’s Clearance Center, Direct General, Rock 100, Tractor Supply, The Whole Dozen, Glendale or Alcorn Central schools. “Over the past few years, the Cash Express toy, canned food and coat drive has helped over 100,000 families in the states of Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama and Kentucky,” said Cash Express Owner and CEO Garry McNabb. “Historically, the response from the local community to this effort has been heartfelt and with open arms.” Cash Express is pairing up with local public servants to make a difference in the lives of others. “We invite you to join us in this celebration of giving,” said Smith. (For more information or assistance call Amy or Summer at 662-396-2389.)
Corinth native, MSU president named to SEC panel
by Associated Press
Oct 25, 2014 | 1 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
STARKVILLE — Mississippi State University President Mark Keenum has been named to a committee that will search for a new commissioner of the Southeastern Conference. Commissioner Mike Slive announced last week he will retire from the post next July, after 13 years in that position. Keenum is a Corinth native. Others on the search committee are David Gearhart, chancellor of the University of Arkansas; Judith Bonner, president of the University of Alabama; Eli Capilouto, president of the University of Kentucky; and R. Bowen Loftin, chancellor of the University of Missouri. The committee will work with athletic directors, faculty representatives, senior women administrators and student athletes in the search.
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