e-Edition Jobs Specialty Publications Buy Photos Contact Us
Bill Avery captured this shot of Joe McKewen in June for inclusion in a recent photo exhibit at the art gallery.
Bill Avery captured this shot of Joe McKewen in June for inclusion in a recent photo exhibit at the art gallery.
slideshow
Mckewen auction includes historic items
by For Daily Corinthian
Jul 10, 2014 | 1 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Bill Avery captured this shot of Joe McKewen in June for inclusion in a recent photo exhibit at the art gallery.
Bill Avery captured this shot of Joe McKewen in June for inclusion in a recent photo exhibit at the art gallery.
slideshow
When health issues affected both Joe and Doris McKewen late last fall, it became clear their photography studio must be sold and its contents moved. A formidable feat loomed, but with the help of lifelong friends and fans of the couple, it was accomplished. Joe’s 56 years of priceless negatives were packed (along with an entire building of memorabilia, props and furniture), moved, and stored, awaiting disposition. An auction of the McKewen building contents will be held Monday, July 21, at 6 p.m., including many Corinth historical items, photography studio props and general building contents. Benefiting McKewen, the auction will be held at the former site of the Federal Cotton Compress in Corinth at 401 South Fulton Drive. The auction will be conducted by Auctioneer John Caldwell of the Tiplersville Auction Company. Items can be inspected that day prior to auction start time on-site between 4 and 6 p.m. Details and photos will be available prior to the auction date on www.auctionzip.com. Most everyone working to help clean out the McKewen studio building saw only lots of furniture, props, picture frames, trash and the mountain of negatives and prints which had to be moved. The late Stephanie Sandy, an avid researcher of local history, had an entirely different vision and immediately saw Joe McKewen’s extensive body of work as something which should be preserved for future historians and generations. She initiated contact with the Mississippi Department of Archives and History (MDAH) in early February 2014. Unfortunately, her rapid health decline and death prevented her from completing the negotiation. Through efforts led by longtime friend Mike McEwen, an agreement was reached with the McKewen family and the MDAH which will allow Stephanie Sandy’s vision to be realized. The Mississippi Department of Archives and History will acquire the complete collection of negatives, which spans roughly 1958 through approximately 2010. Also included are some commercial photographs, a great number of group photos, some street and local scenes of interest, and photographs used for postcards sold and marketed locally. While some of the collection is indexed, the majority is not. To handle the indexing and preservation of negatives will require specialized resources covering a time period in which photography experienced a seismic shift in technology. While digital photographs are common today, Joe McKewen’s career and work was characterized by photographs being special moments in family and social history that deserved the recognition of a professional photographer. Joe McKewen was also a man of far-ranging interests, humor and knowledge, and his photographs captured extensive scenes of politicians, wildlife, community affairs and local history. During the spring, Bill Avery conducted the sale of the bulk of remaining printed photographs and large display prints from the McKewen Photo Studio. Avery will be at Fulton Market Antiques with the last assortment of these photos July 11,12,18 and 19, between noon and 5 p.m. each day. Many early enlargements and prints not previously displayed which were found during final stages of cleaning the building will also be available. This will be the public’s final chance to purchase any of these photos before any remaining are sent to the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. Fulton Market Antiques is located at 401 South Fulton Drive behind the antique steam engine.
Highway Opens
by For Daily Corinthian
Jul 10, 2014 | 1 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A Prentiss Countian killed in action during World War II will have a portion of Highway 364 named in his memory and all World War II veterans have a special invitation to attend the ceremony. The Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) has announced the “Oliver Wendell Pinson Memorial Highway” dedication ceremony has been scheduled for 10 a.m., Friday, July 11, in Cairo. The dedication ceremony, commemorating the life of Seaman Oliver Wendell Pinson, will be held at the New Lebanon Free Will Baptist Church located at 1195 Highway 364 in Cairo. In attendance for the dedication ceremony will be Transportation Commissioner Mike Tagert; Senator J.P. Wilemon Jr., District 5; Representative Tracy Arnold, District 3; and Prentiss County Chancery Clerk David “Bubba” Pounds. Senate Bill 2327 designates and names a stretch of Mississippi Highway 364 (beginning at its intersection of Mississippi Highway 365 and extending to its intersection of County Road 2201) as the “Oliver Wendell Pinson Memorial Highway.” MDOT will erect and maintain appropriate signs along and approaching this segment of highway. “MDOT is honored to dedicate this section of highway as the Oliver Wendell Pinson Memorial Highway,” said Commissioner Tagert. “The recognition of the sacrifice Seaman Pinson made for his country during World War II is most appropriate for his family and the people of north Mississippi.” Seaman Pinson, a Prentiss County native, was aboard the USS Little when she had her first test of World War II on D-Day at Iwo Jima. Seaman Pinson remained at his battle station for over 24 hours during this encounter and helped the USS Little come through the fight without a single loss. However, on May 3, 1945, Seaman Pinson was killed in action when the USS Little was sunk off the coast of Okinawa by Japanese planes. The family of Seaman Pinson would like to invite all World War II veterans to the dedication ceremony.
Blues Fest Comes to arena
by Steve Beavers
Jul 10, 2014 | 1 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Crossroads Arena is getting the blues. "An Evening of the Blues" – starring folk-funk creator Bobby Rush – is coming to the facility on Saturday, November 8. Rush will be joined by special guest Sir Charles Jones, the King of Southern Soul. "I am beyond excited about the show," said Crossroads Arena General Manager Tammy Genovese. "This is another first for the Arena and I am certain it will be one of our most successful shows." Rush, born Emmit Ellis, Jr. in Homer, Louisiana, appeared on the West Side blues circuit in the 1960s. His folk-funk style, a singular sound he dubbed himself, made Rush one of the the most colorful characters on the contemporary chitlin circuit. Once Rush began to develop his own individual sound, he chose to forgo the blues route in favor of targeting the chitlin circuit. The circuit is the name given to the performance venues throughout the eastern, southern, and upper mid-west areas of the United States which were safe and acceptable for African American musicians, comedians, and other entertainers to perform in during the age of racial segregation in the United States. Rush notched his first hit in 1971 with his single "Chicken Heads." Among his songs are "Dangerous," "Hen Pecked," I Got 3 Problems," One Monkey Don't Stop No Show," and "What's Good for the Goose is Good for the Gander." "He has an unique style which brings together a cracked lyrical bent with elements of blues, soul, and funk," said Genovese. Jones, who grew up in Birmingham, Ala., has become one of the more famous faces on the “Southern Soul” scene. With a style which ranges from jazz to fusion and from gospel to blues, Jones taught himself how to write his own music along with arrange and produce it. His first album, Sir Charles Jones, was released in 2000. The opening act will be Lyric, featuring Byrd. Tickets are on sale now. Cost is $42 and $32 for floor seats. Stage left and riser seating is $30 with other riser seating being $23. Ticket service fee and online fees are additional. VIP tables are also available. The tables, floor stage left/right/front, can be purchased through the box office, phone and in person only for $600 per table. The cost includes a limited quantity of eight seats. VIP purchase includes, VIP seating, table service throughout the show, a VIP Reception including a private meet and greet with Bobby Rush, cash bar and light appetizers prior to the show. (For additional information, contact Genovese at 662-287-7779.)
Local drives held for blood
by Kimberly Shelton
Jul 10, 2014 | 1 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The same stream of life that runs through my veins night and day runs through the world and dances in rhythmic measures. It is the same life that shoots in joy through the dust of the earth in numberless blades of grass and breaks into tumultuous waves of leaves and flowers. It is the same life that is rocked in the ocean-cradle of birth and of death, in ebb and in flow. I feel my limbs are made glorious by the touch of this world of life. And my pride is from the life-throb of ages dancing in my blood this moment.– Rabindranath Tagore It is estimated that somewhere in the United States there is a person needing blood every two seconds. According to bloodcenters.org, only 37 percent of the population is eligible to donate blood and less than 10 percent give annually. United Blood Services, a non-profit community blood provider is working diligently to keep up the demand. With over 250 donations needed daily for area patients it is often hard to stay ahead. In response to the growing need, they following locations will be set up for blood donations: • 4 to 8 p.m. on July 16 at East Booneville Baptist Church in the Fellowship Hall(Booneville) • 10:30 a.m. to 1p.m. on July 17 at the Tippah County Hospital in the Bloodmobile (Ripley) • 12 to 4 p.m. on July 18 at Magnolia Regional Health Center in the conference room (Corinth) All blood types are needed, but especially O negative and O positive types. Volunteers must be at least 16 years old, weigh at least 110 pounds and have a clean bill of health in order to donate. Additional height/weight requirements apply to donors 22 and younger, and donors who are 16 years of age must have signed permission from parents or guardian.
Featured Businesses >>