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Bobo Jacobs puts up a wreath for Christy's Creations during the Daily Corinthian/Crossroads Museum Community Yard Sale on Saturday. / Staff photo by Steve Beavers
Bobo Jacobs puts up a wreath for Christy's Creations during the Daily Corinthian/Crossroads Museum Community Yard Sale on Saturday. / Staff photo by Steve Beavers
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Company acquires Avectus Healthcare Solutions
by Jebb Johnston
Jun 30, 2015 | 5 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Bolder Healthcare Solutions has acquired Corinth-based Avectus Healthcare Solutions as the local company continues to expand. The equity partner is expected to help ensure further growth for Avectus, which coordinates third-party liability accounts and resolution of complex workers’ compensation accounts for hospitals and trauma centers. "We are very pleased to become part of the Bolder Healthcare team,” said Avectus CEO Tim Smith. “Bolder Healthcare brings us great resources and market experience as we continue building our highly specialized services over the coming years.” Avectus Operations Manager Chip Wood said the company will continue to be based in Corinth and will have the same commitment to job creation. More than 100 have been hired since announcement of the expansion into the former Chadco building on Tate Street, which will be renovated. “We currently have over 250 jobs in Corinth and are still hiring,” said Wood. Grants totaling more than $1.3 million are in hand for renovating the Chadco building for office space and adding a parking area. “We are delighted that Tim Smith and his team at Avectus will be joining our growing Bolder Healthcare team,” said Bolder CEO Michael Shea. “We are committed to bringing together the best-of-breed companies, people, services and technologies across the healthcare revenue cycle. We believe this combination will be great for clients, Avectus employees and the town of Corinth.” Bolder Healthcare Solutions was formed though a co-investment partnership between The Edgewater Funds and JZ Capital Partners in coordination with Shea. The partnership brings more than $2 billion in committed capital and experience from hundreds of private equity transaction over the last 35 years. Shea and his team are selectively targeting additional acquisition candidates in the revenue cycle management sector.
Museum builds on event success
by Steve Beavers
Jun 30, 2015 | 1 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Bobo Jacobs puts up a wreath for Christy's Creations during the Daily Corinthian/Crossroads Museum Community Yard Sale on Saturday. / Staff photo by Steve Beavers
Bobo Jacobs puts up a wreath for Christy's Creations during the Daily Corinthian/Crossroads Museum Community Yard Sale on Saturday. / Staff photo by Steve Beavers
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Crossroads Museum was on fire in its initial venture into the yard sale business. An afternoon downpour couldn't even dampen sales of the Daily Corinthian/Crossroads Museum Community Yard Sale on Saturday. Another yard sale is in the planning stage for October. "People showed up willing to do whatever to help the museum," said Crossroads Museum Executive Director Brandy Steen. "We had a of bunch donations and it by far exceeded my expectations." Proceeds from 10x10 booth spaces at the yard sale and what the museum made from its own booth went to build housing for the 1924 American LaFrance pumper fire truck donated to the museum. The museum cleared $1,526.61 on Saturday. A total of 25 vendors, with some coming as far away as Lexington, Tenn. and Memphis took part in the first yard sale. Booth space was available for $20. "I am really glad with the amount we raised," said Steen. "It was really busy for a while before the rain drove people away." Unlike the annual Green Market, the yard sale was not governed. Items such as clothing, furniture, glassware, antiques, toys, electronics, handcrafted items, baked and food goods and commercial products could all be sold on Saturday. "Quiet a few people have come by our booth," said vendor Bobo Jacobs, a Lexington, Tenn. resident who was helping at his wife's booth Christy's Creations. "We definitely would consider coming back." Jacobs will get his chance as Steen said the museum plans to have another yard sale on Oct. 17. "We are thinking about doing it twice a year," said the museum director. "One would be in the spring and another in the fall." Original plans to build a two-level platform to keep the truck have been altered to make the structure handicap accessible. Crossroads Museum needs about $50,000 to construct a viewing area to house the fire truck. The first level will be an enclosed, temperature-controlled display area to protect the fire engine from future deterioration. The second level could be used as a viewing platform for visitors to watch or photograph passing trains. Prior to Saturday's sale, $12,000 had been raised for the project.
Efforts aid officer injured in line of duty
by Jebb Johnston
Jun 30, 2015 | 5 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Despite suffering a paralyzing injury in the line of duty nine years ago, former Corinthian Mark Ayers continues his career in law enforcement. In Olive Branch, where he works as a police officer, the community is rallying to help raise funds for the purchase of a new specially equipped van for Ayers. The Olive Branch City Park will host numerous activities on July 11 including a 5K race, poker run, tennis tournament, arts and crafts fair and music. Local business owner Amy Hughes is coordinating the event. “I believe it is our civic duty to support, take care of, appreciate and just generally care for one another as human beings, especially when it is for someone like Mark who put his life on the line for our safety on a daily basis,” she said. “In a time when there seems to be so much hate and resentment toward one another, I believe it’s important that we openly show our love and support for each other and for our peacekeepers.” Ayers is a 1989 Corinth High School graduate who worked as a patrolman for the Corinth Police Department from 1996 to 1999. He served in the military from 1991 to 1995, including Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. The injury happened in the early a.m. hours of June 29, 2006, when Ayers and another officer encountered a vehicle stopped in the middle of the road. The man in the vehicle shot the other officer and then shot Ayers as he was stepping out of the patrol car. Ayers was struck twice, and the spinal injury left him paralyzed from the upper chest down. “I never really thought about how dangerous the job is, but I had come close to getting hurt several times before,” said Ayers. He was once hit by a car when trying to stop someone. The driver rammed the patrol car as he was getting out. Living with the injury requires much extra work and planning. “To function in day-to-day life, you have to really relearn everything,” said Ayers. “The simplest things take a lot of time. There’s a lot of things you can’t do that you once were able to do or go places that you were able to.” He is grateful to see the many people involved in trying to improve his transportation. “It’s hard to put into words how much you appreciate it,” he said. For event registration or to make a donation, contact Hughes at (901) 721-3143.
Rienzi mayor completes municipal training
by Kimberly Shelton
Jun 30, 2015 | 0 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
RIENZI – Six long years of hard work, dedication and study have paid off for Rienzi Mayor Walter Williams who recently completed the training necessary for the Professional Development Level of the Certified Municipal Official (CMO) program from the Mississippi Municipal League. Graduating on Tuesday, June 23, the Rienzi municipal leader finished with an impressive 142 elective credits. “The laws change so often that you really have to stay on top of them,” said Mayor Williams who just returned from attending Summer Convention on the gulf coast. “A lot of people think it's all one big party when they go to conferences, but it’s not if you go for the right reasons.” “It shouldn’t be about partying, sight-seeing or deep-sea fishing,” he added. “You are representing your community when you go and they do keep track of your attendence.” Required of all mayors, alderman, clerks and other officials, classes typically begin at 8 a.m. and last until 5 p.m. “You have some degree of free time, but it is mostly at night,” said Williams who wrapped up his Basic certification in 2012 and his Advanced Certification in 2013. “The classes are taught by some of the brightest, most intelligent professors, mayors, engineers and alderman around. So, it is a really great thing.” Broken up into three certification levels, the MML’s CMO program consists of Basic, Advanced and Professional Development training. The Basic Level requires 60 hours of training with a focus on the basics of municipal organization, law, finance and land use. Advanced requires an additional 40 hours of training in community and economic development; and Professional Development, which requires another 40 hours of course work while encouraging the improvement of skills such as public speaking, writing and interpersonal communications. Officials who earn the Professional Development level must have first completed the Basic and Advanced Levels of the program. "The Professional Development Level of the CMO program gives our municipal leaders the opportunity to focus on personal growth and improvements in leadership skills,” said MML Executive Director Shari T. Veazey. “Those who have completed all three levels of CMO program have made a strong commitment to self-improvement and, as a result, will be more effective municipal leaders." Having achieved his goal and earning his Professional Development certification, the mayor can now turn his attention to other endeavors. “I have been blessed this past year,” said Williams who has some really big plans in the works. “I was fortunate to get everything I have applied for and look forward to seeing Rienzi continue to grow and prosper.” Future plans include the development of a Memorial Park and walking track, the extension of existing sewer lines and the implementation of 12 miles of gas lines which will give residents the option of using natural gas, a cheaper alternative to propane. Established in 1931, MML represents 293 city, town and village governments in Mississippi. Their mission is to help cities and towns excel through training, lobbying at the state and federal level, and by providing resources and networking opportunities with state, federal and private entities.
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