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People of the Crossroads – Jason Burcham, Corinth
Jun 30, 2016 | 0 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
After running a seafood truck in Birmingham, Ala. for three years, Jason Burcham has brought his business back to his hometown. “I wanted to provide for my family by the work I put in for myself, not for others. Being an owner/operator allows me to ensure quality, fair pricing and consistency.” Established in May, Crossroads Seafood Co., LLC sells seafood from the Gulf Coast (Pass Christian) as well as alligator and andouille sausage from Louisiana.The stand, located at 2022 Hwy 72 East (in the Donald’s Doughnut parking lot) also sells seasoning. Jason is the husband of Megan Burcham, the father of Reid Burcham, the son of Chris Burcham and the brother of Rocky Burcham and Steven “Oochoow” Johnson. He can be reached at 662-415-0391, on Facebook, or by email at crossroadsseafood@gmail.com.
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Death notices for Friday, July 1, 2016
Jun 30, 2016 | 1 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Larry Doby Avery Funeral services for Larry Doby Avery, 67, of Corinth are set for 3 p.m. Sunday at St. Rest M.B. Church with burial in St. Rest Cemetery. Mr. Avery died Tuesday, June 28, 2016. Robert ‘Bobby’ Curtiss Betterton WALNUT – A memorial service for Robert “Bobby” Curtiss Betterton, 51, is set for 4 p.m. Saturday at Grace Apostolic Pentecostal Church in Middleton, Tenn. Mr. Betterton died Tuesday, June 28, 2016 at North Mississippi Medical Center in Tupelo. Charles Coln SAVANNAH, Tenn. – Funeral services for Charles Thomas Coln, 74, are set for 1 p.m. Sunday at Magnolia Funeral Home Chapel of Memories with burial in Pleasant Ridge Cemetery in Glen. Mr. Coln died Saturday, June 25, 2016. Sharron Lee Hensley Sharron Hensley, 76, died Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at Magnolia Regional Health Center. Services are pending and will be announced once complete. David Wayne Hill Funeral services for David Wayne Hill are set for 11 a.m. Saturday at McPeters Inc. Funeral Directors Chapel with burial in Valley of the Dogwood Cemetery. Mr. Hill died Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at Methodist North Hospital in Memphis. Tommy H. Morgan Funeral services for Tommy Harold Morgan, 62, of Corinth are set for 11 a.m. Saturday at Christ Gospel Church in Burnsville with burial in the church cemetery. Mr. Morgan died Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at his residence. Dewayne Moss MASON, Tenn. – Funeral services for Thomas Dewayne Moss, 41, are set for 2 p.m. Saturday at Tuscumbia Baptist Church with burial in the church cemetery. Mr. Moss died Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at his residence.
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Things I never expected to see
by Lora Ann Huff
Jun 30, 2016 | 106 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
In the past I heard my parents act with surprise and sometimes disgust at things that happened and comment, “I never thought I would live to see the day…” Now I find myself repeating those words in my mind, whether or not I speak them out loud. Our parents, in their early years, never thought they would see transatlantic airplane flights become ordinary. Charles Lindbergh flew non-stop across the ocean in 1927, the year after my parents married, and they read about it and heard the news on the radio. They saw the stock market crash in 1929 and watched people suffer from losing their money when the banks closed, all leading to the Great Depression. They struggled through the hard times and appreciated brighter days when the economy finally improved. They lost their first baby to pneumonia because there was no antibiotic to cure it; some years later they saw the introduction of penicillin as an antibiotic to stop dreaded infections and diseases. They listened to the radio as World War II unfolded and they learned of all the atrocities of a madman named Adolph Hitler. They lived through that and learned about how to discern the motives and attitudes of leaders. They saw the introduction of television and live news broadcasts - so many things happened that were almost unbelievable. Then in the summer of 1969, astronauts landed on the moon for the first time. As I’ve mentioned before, our younger grandchildren are fascinated right now about outer space so I recently explained to them about the Sunday in July 1969 when my parents and I, along with my brothers’ families, were eating homemade ice cream under the big oak tree when some of us took time out to go inside the house and watch the televised landing by Neil Armstrong and fellow explorers. I saw the black and white TV screens change to color and viewed live news reports from distant lands. Sometimes we thought there was too much information out there. …And today I know there’s too much information at our fingertips – too many crude details, and the sad thing is that some of the information may not be correct. People can text, post comments, and e-mail all sorts of “stuff,” be it good or be it bad and disrespectful. That’s something I thought I would never see. I never expected to see radical extremists strap on suicide vests and blow themselves up in order to kill others like the Japanese kamikaze pilots in World War II. I never expected to see a presidential campaign where a leading candidate would stand before crowds of people and cuss and rant and call people names. I thought I left all those bullies on the playground a long time ago. In an era where education has been praised and promoted as the most important way to prepare children for a productive future, I never expected to see elected state officials cut funding for our public schools. I never expected to see more emphasis placed on legalizing liquor sales and liquor by the drink than on trying to entice industries to come to our area and provide jobs for our people. I never expected to see people walking around town with pistols strapped to their sides like in the old West. If I sound discouraged about our society, I am. I think many of our adults have not learned much about history and which things in the past produced positive results versus the ones that brought about bad results. …So, like my parents, there are many things happening today I never thought I would see take place. I only wish the next surprises would be happy and exciting ones – like discovering a cure for cancer, preventing Alzheimer’s, signing peace treaties, ending terrorism. I’m so tired of saying, “Well, that beats all I’ve ever seen,” and it being a negative comment rather than a positive one!
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Packing for travel is difficult but necessary part of experience
by Stacy Jones
Jun 30, 2016 | 93 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
As I sit writing this column, I should be packing, getting ready for a vacation in San Francisco. For someone who loves to travel, I ought to be better at packing—although, over time, I believe I am getting better. I have two weaknesses when it comes to packing: first, I overpack, and, second, I wait until the last minute, my indecisive self always getting the better of me. I do better when each day of the trip is planned out, so that I will know better what I might want to wear on a trip. However, I’m also the sort who enjoys some spontaneity, so sometimes I resist having a set day-by-day itinerary on a pleasure trip. When it comes to clothing, I like having “options,” and I always bring at least one extra outfit on a trip. One never knows—especially if one tends to be clumsy—when the sauce from that sumptuous authentic Mexican taco at lunch will end up dripping from the wrapper onto one’s pants or drops of that glass of red wine from dinner will end up dotting one’s shirt. Thus, I feel it is always better to travel like a Boy Scout: by being prepared. However, the problem with being so indecisive and wanting “options” is that the airlines now charge for almost every square centimeter of space available on the plane. One day there will probably be a surcharge for breathing, since it requires that the person exercising his or her involuntary air intake have extra space in front of the mouth and nose. I almost invariably have to check a suitcase both going and coming, which generally adds up to an extra $25 each way on most airlines. My friend Tom, with whom I occasionally travel, refers to it my “steamer trunk.” Another part of the problem with having a carry-on for me is that, thanks to the 2006 London terrorists who derived explosives from liquids and gels, I have to check a bag, considering that I have trouble fitting my toiletries into a quart-sized bag. I have worked on doing better, but every time I try, I fail miserably. I vow eventually to devise my own methodology to compact multiple liquids into such a minute space, as a woman may desire several liquid-based toiletry items on a daily basis. These items include, but not limited to, shampoo, conditioner, deep conditioner, body wash, toothpaste, concealer, mascara, facial moisturizer, hairspray, hair pomade, and lotion. I’m willing to bet the powers that be that made a rule that no one can stow bottles larger than 3.4 ounces, all of it fitting neatly inside a quart-sized bag, in a carry-on bag on a plane were definitely not women. My system for packing is pretty simple: I lay everything out on the bed by outfit, pants on bottom, then tops, then underclothing. I pack it all in zippered bags, called e-cubes, which fit on one side of my hardside spinner suitcase. That way, all outfits are organized together. The other side of my suitcase is reserved for toiletries, shoes, and belts. One main problem I have, though, is that I am not as neat in folding dirty clothes as I was in folding the clean ones when I originally packed the suitcase. Therefore, I end up with a suitcase bursting at the seams when it is time for the return flight. When I am packing to leave, I generally have to sit on my suitcase to zip it. When I pack for the return flight, I not only have to sit on the case, but I also have to finagle the two zippers in a several-minute struggle until I get it to close. I wish good fortitude for the airport worker who decides that the inside of my luggage must be examined on the return flight. He will need it to get my sprawling suitcase re-zipped after opening. Nevertheless, despite my obstacles in getting ready to travel, the trip is always worth it. I often think I enjoy the journey as much as the trip itself. It is exciting, being on the brink of the unknown, ready to explore and have new experiences. St. Augustine compared travel to a book, and “those,” he said, “who don’t travel only read a page.” (Daily Corinthian columnist Stacy Jones teaches English at McNairy Central High School and UT Martin and has served on the board of directors at Corinth Theatre-Arts. She enjoys being a downtown Corinth resident.)
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