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Smith gets 10 years in child assault case
by Jebb Johnston
Mar 28, 2017 | 530 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A Corinth man will serve the maximum possible sentence on charges of aggravated assault of a child and misdemeanor domestic violence. After a trial and guilty verdict last week, Michael Lynn Smith appeared in Alcorn County Circuit Court Tuesday morning before Judge Thomas Gardner III for sentencing. The judge imposed a sentence of 10 years in custody of the Mississippi Department of Corrections on the assault charge and six months in custody of the Alcorn County sheriff on the misdemeanor charge. The sentence on the assault charge includes a fine of $2,500 and payment of $1,000 to the Mississippi Children’s Trust Fund. The misdemeanor includes a $500 fine. The sentences are consecutive, for a total of 10 years and six months, and are also consecutive to a prior five-year sentence out of Prentiss County for accessory after the fact. Smith declined the opportunity to make a statement. After hearing a request for leniency from Smith’s grandmother, the judge said he accepts the jury’s determination of the facts. “My only comment about the circumstances in this case is that I have never seen the kind of beating this little girl took,” said Gardner. “You are fortunate that you were not charged with the death of this child because of the injuries she had. You heard the testimony of the expert, the doctor who testified about her injuries, and the nurse who looked at her and was instrumental in getting her immediate medical care. I cannot imagine anybody doing such a thing.” The alleged victim — the daughter of his former wife — was three years old at the time. In December 2015, a grand jury returned a two-count indictment accusing Smith of causing bodily harm to a child under the age of five and strangling or attempting to strangle Kelsey Moore of Booneville, who was his wife at the time. Moore testified last week that Smith committed violent acts against her on several occasions. She said she discovered injuries on the child after leaving her home alone with her husband. Smith was in the care of his grandmother until age 14. She told Gardner she knows in her heart that he is not guilty.
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Deadline Saturday for homestead filing
by Jebb Johnston
Mar 28, 2017 | 0 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Alcorn County Tax Assessor’s Office is opening on Saturday to help people avoid missing a tax credit. People who have bought a home or had certain status changes in the past year should visit the office to file an application for homestead exemption. With the April 1 deadline falling on Saturday, the office is opening from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. for the last chance to file. Tax Assessor Kenneth Brawner wants to see all residents who are eligible get the break on property taxes. “The people who miss it usually are the first-time homebuyers,” said Brawner. “It’s not something that is done at closing when a home is sold. They have to come to the office and apply for it.” People who move in from other states sometimes are not aware of the credit. Based on assessed value, the homestead exemption gives a credit of up to $300. Residents 65 and older can get exemption on the first $75,000 of value. People who have divorced or lost a spouse in the past year need to re-file. Brawner said last year’s filing season had around 650 new applications, and this year is running around 700. Items needed to file for exemption include Social Security number (both parties, if a married couple), Alcorn County license plate numbers and the purchase price of the property. Those filing after becoming 100 percent disabled need to show proof of Social Security disability entitlement with the beginning date of disability or a disabled veteran’s claim number. The state provides a reimbursement to counties for the ad valorem tax credit, which came about as a way to encourage home ownership.
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Effie May Hooten, wife of W.W. Hooten, was the owner of the glasses and the appointment card found by Peggy Drewry Smith. She had wondered about the owner of the glasses since she noticed the date for the next appointment - Sept. 2, 1939.
Effie May Hooten, wife of W.W. Hooten, was the owner of the glasses and the appointment card found by Peggy Drewry Smith. She had wondered about the owner of the glasses since she noticed the date for the next appointment - Sept. 2, 1939.
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This year's Magnolia Classic Racking Horse Show will feature the 2016 Racking Horse World Grand Champion "Tears" ridden by Jamie Lawrence.
This year's Magnolia Classic Racking Horse Show will feature the 2016 Racking Horse World Grand Champion "Tears" ridden by Jamie Lawrence.
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Mystery solved: Story inspires former area resident
by L.A. Story
Mar 28, 2017 | 14 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Effie May Hooten, wife of W.W. Hooten, was the owner of the glasses and the appointment card found by Peggy Drewry Smith. She had wondered about the owner of the glasses since she noticed the date for the next appointment - Sept. 2, 1939.
Effie May Hooten, wife of W.W. Hooten, was the owner of the glasses and the appointment card found by Peggy Drewry Smith. She had wondered about the owner of the glasses since she noticed the date for the next appointment - Sept. 2, 1939.
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A Corinth woman discovered a mystery through a piece of “carport junk” she found in 1989, but a former Crossroads area resident stepped up to help solve it. James Gray, a Tishomingo County native now retired in Nashville, Tenn., still keeps up with his hometown area. He read the story where Peggy Drewry Smith of Corinth had found a sort of micro time capsule in an old eyeglass case. Smith purchased the eyeglass case for 50 cents at a carport sale in 1989. Smith said she later tossed the case into a drawer and it lay there forgotten until 2017, when she decided to some cleaning. She rediscovered the case in the process of clearing out the drawer and opened it. Inside was a pair of round, black-rimmed glasses. The glasses shared the case with a small appointment card. It was tucked beneath the eyewear. The card was colored with age and dotted, possibly from the worn metal inside the case. The patient’s name on the card was Mrs. W., (there was a second letter which looked almost like another “W”), Hooten of Tishomingo. Mrs. Hooten’s next appointment was scheduled for Sept. 2, 1939. Her appointment appeared to be with a Dr. Klein’s Optical Department at Bry’s in Memphis, Tenn. There is a phone number, but with an old exchange. Gray read the story and decided to do a bit of digging. He said the tools he used were the U.S. Census for 1940 and Find A Grave. “Both are helpful from time to time and I've always enjoyed mysteries,” said Gray. What Gray discovered was the Hootens were the only ones in Tishomingo County in 1940. He noticed in the census data, it seemed the couple came to Tishomingo County from Memphis, Tenn. They are now buried in Memphis, Tenn., which appeared to be their original home. “Family history has been an on and off hobby for me since the mid-1980s, so over the years I've done a bit of research. It generally pays to look at the original census enumeration if possible as mistakes were sometimes made in its transcription to an index. Old arcane abbreviations and simple cursive writing throw lots of folks these days,” said Gray. Thus, per the census data, the owner of the glasses was very likely Effie May Hooten, wife of W.W. Hooten. She was born May 14, 1885, and died June 28, 1973. She is buried at Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown in Memphis, Tenn. Gray was also able to locate information on Bry’s, which was a Memphis department store. He said he believed it was possible the store had an optical department such as Walmart or Sears stores do today. According to information gained from Vance Laurderdale’s Jan. 1, 2008, answer to a question about Bry’s (which is pronounced like “breeze”), he explained the store was a Memphis landmark for more than 50 years. It opened in 1908, relocated to a larger building in 1925 and eventually closed in 1964. When asked about her reaction to having her little mystery solved, Smith said, “This is just great. Now, I know. I can’t wait to tell my friends about it.” For a while it seemed the eyeglass case and its contents were just items lost in time, along with their owner. Smith’s curiosity is settled with having found the name and the fate of the owner.
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