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Minimum wage laws are destroying jobs
by Larry Elder
Jun 22, 2017 | 77 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
In the '60s my parents opened a small diner near downtown Los Angeles. As a child, I watched my parents sitting at the kitchen table, discussing their plans for what they considered a huge expansion of the business -- hiring a dishwasher. But my parents kept putting off the decision, in large part because of a proposed minimum-wage hike. This would've made the additional employee, as I recall my parents concluding, "too expensive." This brings us to the impact of recent minimum wage hikes in California. The owner of a small restaurant told me that Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti invited several small business owners to city hall to discuss the impact of a proposed minimum wage hike. Several brought profit-and-loss statements. Each business person, the small restaurant owner said, tried to convince the Democratic mayor that their profit margins were too small to take the wage hike without laying people off, cutting hours or raising prices, which usually means a falloff in business. At the end of the meeting the mayor simply said, "I feel confident that you can absorb the cost." A new study by two researchers, one with Mathematica Policy Research and the other with Harvard Business School, focused on "the impact of the minimum wage on restaurant closures using data from the San Francisco Bay area." The researchers concluded that "a $1 increase in the minimum wage leads to approximately a 4 to 10 percent increase in the likelihood of exit." They wrote: "The evidence suggests that higher minimum wages increase overall exit rates for restaurants. However, lower quality restaurants, which are already closer to the margin of exit, are disproportionately impacted by increases to the minimum wage." So the most vulnerable restaurants -- the more "affordable" ones -- appear to be the most hurt by a minimum wage hike. In January, the East Bay Times reported that 60 restaurants in the San Francisco Bay area had shuttered their doors since September. Even the mighty have fallen. The Fresno Bee recently wrote: "Joining San Francisco's restaurant die-off was rising star AQ, which in 2012 was named a James Beard Award finalist for the best new restaurant in America. The restaurant's profit margins went from a reported 8.5 percent in 2012 to 1.5 percent by 2015. Most restaurants are thought to require margins of 3 and 5 percent." In San Diego, voters approved an $11.50 per hour minimum wage for 2017, up from an $8 minimum wage in June 2014. This is an increase of 44 percent -- in just two and a half years! The San Diego Union Tribune recently reported: "Evidence has emerged of an economic dark side to San Diego's decision last year to vault over the state minimum wage -- it may have already destroyed thousands of jobs for low-wage workers even as higher pay helps tens of thousands of others. "Consider the restaurant industry, for example, which economists study because it relies on low-wage workers, yet generally faces no foreign or out-of-state competition. Amid an abrupt slowdown in growth, nearly 4,000 food-service jobs may have been cut or not created throughout San Diego County from the beginning of 2016 through February of this year." The now-defunct organization called the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now came to California years ago to gather signatures on a petition for a ballot measure to increase minimum wage. Incredibly, ACORN sued the state to exempt itself from the then-current minimum wage and overtime laws. In its filings, ACORN said, "The more ACORN must pay each individual outreach worker -- either because of minimum wage or overtime requirements -- the fewer outreach workers it will be able to hire." Can't make this stuff up. When George McGovern, the 1972 Democratic presidential candidate, left the Senate, he bought the Stratford Inn, a small Connecticut inn and restaurant. It went bust and he blamed, in part, the very kind regulations he passed as a politician devoid of business experience. "I wish I had known more firsthand about the concerns and problems of American businesspeople while I was a U.S. senator and later a presidential nominee," said McGovern. "... I learned by owning the Stratford Inn is that legislators and government regulators must more carefully consider the economic and management burdens we have been imposing on U.S. businesses. ... Many businesses, especially small independents such as the Stratford Inn, simply can't pass such costs on to their customers and remain competitive or profitable." As for the mayor of Los Angeles, it should be noted that he worked on a Ph.D.at the London School of Economics. But at this famed institute, Garcetti did not study economics. He studied "ethnicity and nationalism." Makes sense. Larry Elder is a best-selling author and nationally syndicated radio talk-show host. To find out more about Larry Elder, or become an "Elderado," visit www.LarryElder.com. Follow Larry on Twitter @larryelder.
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We must stop the hate speech
by Dr. Glenn Mollette
Jun 22, 2017 | 83 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Hate speech doesn't work for any person or group in America. The result is always hurt. The shooting of Majority Whip Steve Scalise at a baseball practice is further proof. Here are some of the comments and other rhetoric that Sean Hannity recently remarked about on an evening broadcast and his website. Hollywood Actor Mark Ruffalo calls on NBC News to "cease hiring white conservatives." "Knights for Socialism" group at a Florida University teaches students how to "fight the fascists." Anti-Trump "resistance" leaders say they want to "Make America Ungovernable," call for "direct action" tactics against Republicans. Kathy Griffin's photo shoot depicting President Trump's severed head. Charlie Sheen wishes death on Donald Trump, tweeting, "Dear God; Trump next, please! Trump next, please!" following the death of actress Carrie Fisher. President Trump murdered in musician Marilyn Manson's music video. Katie Tur insinuates Donald Trump will begin killing journalists on MSNBC, saying "Donald Trump has made no secret about going after journalists" Unhinged NYU professor calls on students to attack conservative speaker Gavin McInnes, calls his supporters "Nazis." Rachel Maddow says Donald Trump wants to murder journalists. Comedian Jim Carrey supports Kathy Griffin's photo shoot, says he dreams of killing President Trump. Madonna says she wants to "blow up the White House" during a speech. Black Lives Matter say they want to "fry cops like bacon" during a rally in Minnesota. President Obama urges liberal activists to, "Get in their faces." Actor Mickey Rourke goes on anti-Trump rant, says "F*** him, F*** the horse he rode in on, his wife's one of the biggest gold-diggers I know." Rapper Big Sean raps about murdering Donald Trump with an icepick. Late-Night host Stephen Colbert goes on anti-Trump tirade, calls him "Vladimir Putin's c***-holster." Comedian Bill Maher jokes about Trump family incest. Rapper Snoop Dogg stages phony execution of 'clown' Donald Trump. NBC and New York Times contributor Malcolm Nance calls on ISIS to suicide-bomb Trump-owned properties. NYC Theater group stages performance of 'Julius Caesar,' showing the savage stabbing-death of 'Donald Trump.' Protesters in Philadelphia chant "Kill Trump - Kill Pence" during May Day demonstrations. Thanks To Sean Hannity and SeanHannity.com for providing this startling information. We've heard many times that sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me. Words are painful but often lead to very cruel actions. While some of these American personalities hopefully would never act out their speech, their speech influences America. Millions read social media, watch television and they follow America's celebrities. Speech is influential when it comes from so many people who are in the public eye. President Trump is not a perfect man nor is Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton or Mike Pence. We should help President Trump accomplish something. We should build the wall; take some of the tax burden off businesses and the average American taxpayer. We should stop wasting Americans' money that is paid into Social Security so that seniors will have something to count on in their senior years. We need our roads, bridges and water systems in America fixed or replaced. We need to continue to build strong energy sources such as wind, solar, natural gas and clean coal. We need to work together to help our kids receive good educations without costing the price of a new house. We need to fix the high cost of medical care and prescription drugs. Some of America's neighborhoods are out of hand with reported murders every night. Spewing hate filled venomous words at each other solves nothing. All political sides need to tone it down. Calling for hurt or even death to the President or any law abiding citizen is evil. We need to all become human beings again, stop being stupid, go to work and resolve our problems. Glenn Mollette is a syndicated columnist and author of twelve books. He is read in all fifty states.
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New agriculture secretary visits Mississippi Delta
by Senator Roger Wicker
Jun 22, 2017 | 85 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Sonny Perdue was sworn in as the 31st Secretary of Agriculture less than two months ago, but he has already made a trip to Mississippi, delivering a forward-looking address at this year’s Delta Council meeting. The former governor of Georgia and first Southerner to head the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) in more than two decades shared his commitment to future prosperity and growth in rural America. It was an honor for me to introduce him at the event. The Delta Council has been promoting agriculture and economic development in our state’s 18 Delta counties since the Great Depression. In his speech, Secretary Perdue commended the organization’s long history, its support for improving lives, and the example it sets for civic responsibility. He also praised the partnership between USDA’s Agricultural Research Service and Mississippi State University in Stoneville, remarking during his speech that he had “never seen a better collaboration between state and federal partners.” The Trump Administration’s attention to the unique challenges and needs of rural communities should be encouraging to Mississippians in all parts of our state, not just the Delta. As the Secretary noted, the recovery from the Great Recession has been slow in rural areas of the country, with high rates of poverty and dwindling populations. To reverse that trend, he told the crowd, “You’ve got my heart, soul, and my rolled-up-sleeves hard work to make sure rural America gets its fair share and prospers over the next decade in this United States of America.” Secretary Perdue also outlined a broad plan for this success. He promised to support solution-driven collaboration in the federal government, the elimination of onerous regulations, innovation in rural areas such as broadband development, and market access for U.S. agriculture through free and fair trade. I support these goals, and I look forward to working with Secretary Perdue and the entire Administration to achieve them. As chairman of the Senate subcommittee for Internet issues, I am pleased with the Secretary’s interest in rural broadband deployment. Not only can this infrastructure help spur economic growth, but it also paves the way for advancements in telehealth and precision agriculture. Just a few days after delivering the Delta Council’s keynote address, Secretary Perdue appeared before the agriculture subcommittee of the Senate Appropriations Committee to discuss the President’s Fiscal Year 2018 budget for USDA. In that hearing, he underscored his role as a voice for rural America. He also noted strategic changes to the organization of the department, with the Rural Development program now reporting directly to the Secretary’s office. He reiterated in his prepared testimony that the “economic vitality of small towns across America is crucial to the future of the agriculture economy.” Alongside budget and appropriations considerations, Congress and USDA are looking ahead to the next Farm Bill. The negotiations surrounding this important piece of legislation are crucial to our state and our farmers, who produce food and fiber for the nation and world. As these talks progress, I am glad the new agriculture secretary has already had a chance to hear directly from Mississippians during his time in the Delta. I am hopeful it will be one of many visits.
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Escapee convicted of sexual battery
Jun 21, 2017 | 105 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A Prentiss County man who recently led authorities on a multi-day manhunt after escaping from jail has been convicted of sexual battery following trial in Prentiss County. David Joe Glasco, 38, was convicted Thursday in Prentiss County Circuit Court of sexual battery and sentenced to 35 years in prison to be served day for day without the possibility of parole. He must also register as a sex offender upon his release from prison. He was arrested after his five-year-old victim reported the abuse to a teacher. “When Glasco committed this atrocious sex crime and thought he could take advantage of a small defenseless child without a fight, he didn’t consider the resolve of our investigators, our local agencies dedicated to assisting child victims and our prosecution team. The Prentiss County Sheriff’s Department, Family Resource Center, teachers who take their responsibilities seriously, a very brave child and many others are to be commended for their diligence in this case,” said District Attorney John Weddle. Sheriff Randy Tolar said he’s thankful for all those involved in the prosecution of the case. “I personally want to thank the jury for being the victim’s advocate in this very emotional case. Everyone involved with the case is to be commended for the expertise in which the case was handled including Prentiss County Investigator Roy Ragin, Deputy Ken Shackleford, District Attorney Prosecutors Kimi Kitchens and Kyle Robbins all the Social Workers with both Child Protective Services and The Family Resource Center and numerous others. This trial posed a significant security risks that was evident by an increased law enforcement presence throughout the trial. Glasco was one of three inmates that escaped the Prentiss County jail recently. He will later face charges related to the escape as well as the subsequent theft of two vehicles before being recaptured in the Cherokee, Alabama area.” The case was investigated by sheriff’s department investigator Roy Ragin and prosecuted by assistant district attorneys Kimi Kitchens and Kyle Robbins. Glasco was among three inmates from the Prentiss County Jail who escaped earlier this month and were recaptured after making their way to Colbert County, Ala.
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Thrasher gets new principal, coaches
Jun 21, 2017 | 45 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Thrasher High School will have a new face at the helm along with two new coaches on the sidelines following recent resignations and hirings. Kenny Sparks, previously principal at Red Bay High School, will take over as principal at THS after being approved by the Prentiss County School Board. He will take the position being left vacant with the resignation of Jeff Boren who has been named principal at Alcorn Central Middle School where he previously served as assistant principal. Thrasher head football coach Lamart Harvey also resigned recently. The board has approved former Corinth High School coach Perry Murphy as the new head coach of the Rebels. Murphy most recently coached at Kosciusko. The Rebels will also have a new coach for girls basketball as Mike Cartwright has been named the new head coach for the Lady Rebels. The board also accepted several other resignations recently including Lonnie Murphy as assistant director at the Prentiss County Vo-Tech, Janice Winfield as a teacher at Thrasher, Monica Harvey as a teacher at Thrasher, Denise Downs at Thrasher and Devin Tucker, a Title I assistant at Wheeler. Recent hires include Steven Hodgin at Wheeler, Sydney Kather at Hills Chapel, Molly Koon Bonds at Marietta, Katrina Hatfield at Wheeler and Chris Butler at New Site. Ronny Kesler was elected to serve another term as chairman of the school board and Randy Maness was elected as the board secretary. The board approved a new pay scale for the central office and for administrative personnel. Salary increases were approved for educational service center secretary Melba Crabb and Student Data Coordinator and technology director Andrea Allen.
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