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(Back row from left) Sheila and Mark Gardner of Gardner’s and Roger’s Supermarkets; Bart Doran of Medical Plaza/Gooseberry Frozen Yogurt on Harper; and Corinth Civitan Club President Lesley Raines. (Front row from left) Cristy Braddock and Angela Warren of Belk of Corinth; and Amanda Reebes and Darla Taylor of Taylor’s Escape. Joe’s Shoes was honored in absentia.
(Back row from left) Sheila and Mark Gardner of Gardner’s and Roger’s Supermarkets; Bart Doran of Medical Plaza/Gooseberry Frozen Yogurt on Harper; and Corinth Civitan Club President Lesley Raines. (Front row from left) Cristy Braddock and Angela Warren of Belk of Corinth; and Amanda Reebes and Darla Taylor of Taylor’s Escape. Joe’s Shoes was honored in absentia.
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Civitan Club honors community partners
by Kimberly Shelton
Feb 23, 2017 | 109 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
(Back row from left) Sheila and Mark Gardner of Gardner’s and Roger’s Supermarkets; Bart Doran of Medical Plaza/Gooseberry Frozen Yogurt on Harper; and Corinth Civitan Club President Lesley Raines. (Front row from left) Cristy Braddock and Angela Warren of Belk of Corinth; and Amanda Reebes and Darla Taylor of Taylor’s Escape. Joe’s Shoes was honored in absentia.
(Back row from left) Sheila and Mark Gardner of Gardner’s and Roger’s Supermarkets; Bart Doran of Medical Plaza/Gooseberry Frozen Yogurt on Harper; and Corinth Civitan Club President Lesley Raines. (Front row from left) Cristy Braddock and Angela Warren of Belk of Corinth; and Amanda Reebes and Darla Taylor of Taylor’s Escape. Joe’s Shoes was honored in absentia.
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Expressing gratitude for their community partners, the Corinth Civitan Club hosted a special "thank you" on Wednesday. "We wanted to do something to recognize our local businesses for everything they do for us throughout the year." said Club President Lesley Raines. "They are a vital part of our club and we appreciate everything they do to assist us in continuing our mission of aiding local youth." Meeting at Pizza Grocery at noon, club members and officers honored contributing businesses by presenting them with commemorative plaques. Those recognized were Gardner's and Roger's Supermarkets, Taylor's Escape, Belk of Corinth and Medical Plaza/Gooseberry Frozen Yogurt on Harper Road. Joe's Shoes was honored in absentia. "Like us, these businesses are all about giving back to children, as are we," said Raines. "We could not do what we do and make the impact we have without them." A shining example of community volunteerism, the Civitan Club has its own international research center (the UAB Civitan International Research Center) in Birmingham, Ala. which specializes in the research of autism, brain tumors, epilepsy, Down Syndrome and other disorders. Just over 60 years old, the Corinth Civitan Club was chartered in November of 1956 inside the Waldron Hotel with the mission of providing networking, fellowship, community involvement, personal development and community service with a special emphasis on helping people with developmental disabilities. The Club’s first president was longtime Chancery Clerk Herman Madden. Continuing the legacy started by Madden, over six decades ago, Civitan members plan a variety of events and activities each year in an effort to give back. Some of their projects include awarding the Roscoe Turner Memorial Scholarship to a deserving senior from each local high school and providing Christmas presents (from Belk of Corinth and Joe's Shoe Store) and visits with Santa for local children. The group also holds an annual steak sale, volunteers for events at the Crossroads Arena and raises funds through the sale of their popular Claxton fruit cakes. "One of my favorite aspects of Civitans is the emphasis placed on helping children," said Corinth Civitan Club Vice-President Zeb Taylor. "The Christmas Day we plan for them each year is always my favorite because I love to see the expressions of joy and gratitude on their faces." "My other favorite part is awarding scholarships to high school seniors because education opens up so many doors," he continued. Always on the lookout for new members, the Corinth Civitan Club meets at noon on the first through fourth Wednesday of each month at Taylor’s Escape on Hwy 72.
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What's happening in Sweden
by Rich Lowry
Feb 23, 2017 | 125 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
As if on cue, riots broke out in a heavily immigrant suburb of Stockholm as soon as the media mocked President Donald Trump for a vague warning about immigration-related problems in Sweden. At a campaign rally over the weekend, Trump issued forth with a mystifyingly ominous statement. "You look," he declared, "at what's happening last night in Sweden." What? Had the president invented a nonexistent terror attack? As it turned out, the reference was to a segment on Sweden he had watched on the Fox News show "Tucker Carlson Tonight" the previous night rather than to any specific event in the Nordic country. The ensuing discussion quickly took on the character of much of the debate in the early Trump years -- a blunderbuss president matched against a snotty and hyperventilating press, with a legitimate issue lurking underneath. By welcoming a historic number of asylum-seekers proportionate to its population, Sweden has indeed embarked on a vast social experiment that wasn't well thought out and isn't going very well. The unrest in the Stockholm suburb of Rinkeby after police made an arrest the other night underscored the problems inherent in Sweden's immigration surge. Sweden's admirable humanitarianism is outstripping its capacity to absorb newcomers. Nothing if not an earnest and well-meaning society, Sweden has always accepted more than its share of refugees. Immigration was already at elevated levels before the latest influx into Europe from the Middle East, which prompted Sweden to try to see and raise the reckless open-borders policy of German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Sweden welcomed more than 160,000 asylum-seekers in 2015, and nearly 40,000 in October of that year alone. For a country of fewer than 10 million, this was almost equal to 2 percent of the population -- in one year. The flow doubled the number of asylum-seekers at the height of the Balkans crisis in 1992. The foreign-born proportion of the Swedish population was 18 percent in 2016, double that of 1990. As of 2015, the most common county of origin for the foreign born was Finland, which makes sense as it is a neighboring Scandinavian country. Next are Iraq and Syria. Predictably, it isn't easy to integrate people who don't know the language, aren't highly skilled and come from a foreign culture. Sweden's economic polices don't help. As a report of the Migration Policy Institute put it politely, Sweden is "an interesting case" because "the state is committed to fostering large-scale immigration despite huge integration challenges in the labor market." There is a stark gap in the labor-force-participation rate between the native born (82 percent) and the foreign born, (57 percent). As the Migration Policy Institute points out, Sweden is an advanced economy with relatively few low-skills jobs to begin with. On top of this, high minimum wages and stringent labor protections make it harder for marginal workers to find employment, while social assistance discourages the unemployed from getting work. None of this is a formula for assimilation or social tranquility. In a piece for The Spectator, Swedish journalist Tove Lifvendahl writes, "A parallel society is emerging where the state's monopoly on law and order is being challenged." And the fiscal cost is high. According to Swedish economist Tino Sanandaji, the country spends 1.5 percent of its GDP on the asylum-seekers, more than on its defense budget. Sweden is spending twice of the entire budget of the United Nations High Commissioner responsible for refugees worldwide. Pressed for housing, Sweden has spent as much on sheltering 3,000 people in tents as it would cost to care for 100,000 Syrian refugees in Jordan. It is little wonder that Sweden, where so recently it was forbidden to question the openhanded orthodoxy on immigration, has now clamped down on its borders. Sweden is a unique case, but clearly one of the lessons of its recent experience is, Don't try this at home.
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Trump and the media: Demolition derby
by Cal Thomas
Feb 23, 2017 | 55 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The traditional media have decided not to take President Trump's insults lying down. After what may be the strongest -- and to his supporters -- most thrilling takedown of journalists by any president, Editor and Publisher magazine featured this headline: "Newspapers Aim to Ride 'Trump Bump' to Reach Readers, Advertisers." They may hate him, but they're going to use him: "The Trump administration's combative view of traditional news media as the 'opposition party,' and 'fake news' is turning out to be the best hope in 2017 for newspapers struggling to attract more digital readers and advertisers. The New York Times (NYT.N), the Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal and Gannett Co are building on the online readership they gained during the 2016 presidential election by marketing unbiased reporting as a sales strategy." I laughed at that last line. Unbiased reporting as a sales strategy? It is because some Americans believe the reporting they consume is anything but unbiased that their trust in media is at an historical low. Americans still trust Congress less, but media are in there fiercely racing lawmakers to rock-bottom. If this were a limbo dance, the media trustworthy bar would be so low only an ant could get under it. When CNN's Jim Acosta addressed the president at last Thursday's raucous news conference, he accused Trump of damaging the First Amendment by his frequent questioning of the media's fairness. It is actually the other way around. Most reporters live in a bubble. They spend time with colleagues who share similar secular-progressive views and believe government is best when it is led by liberal Democrats, no matter how many times they fail the people they are supposed to represent. This is the filter through which all ideas are measured and all questions constructed. Some reporters believe they have an obligation to hold leaders accountable, and they are right to a point, but they don't appear to believe anyone should hold them accountable. They think they can say anything and accuse even a president of everything. And when they're wrong, they hardly ever apologize, unless their lie is so blatant that their bosses force the issue. I can't remember the last time any journalist apologized to any president for getting facts wrong. Don't look for that to happen with this president either. The major media seem hungry to destroy him. President Trump is an unconventional president dealing with conventional media. They don't get it. He does. Trump voters hate an establishment that has done far more for itself than it has for the country. They detest a media that trashes their traditional values, faith and beliefs. Trump is their revenge and they are thrilled to watch the media get what they believe journalists have coming. Few people would deny the right or even the obligation of journalists to be skeptical, but, in too many instances, skepticism has become cynicism. Just think of how the media characterizes all things conservative. Think of it this way: You own a restaurant and customers are telling you they don't like the food, your prices are too high, your restrooms are dirty and the wait staff is surly. You have two choices: address the complaints or tell your soon-to-be former customers to take their business elsewhere. The media are like the second choice and as ratings and subscriptions sadly show, people are walking their business out the door. I seriously doubt the newspaper campaign will attract new customers. Virtuous people and noble professions usually don't have to convince others of their virtue and nobility. It is obvious. With much of the media represented at White House press conferences, virtue and nobility are in short supply. (Readers may email Cal Thomas at tcaeditors@tribpub.com.)
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Baldwyn, Booneville district collaboration approved
Feb 22, 2017 | 205 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A new collaboration between the Baldwyn and Booneville school districts will open doors for state of the art learning for students both locally and throughout the region. The districts were approved last week as Mississippi Districts of Innovation, allowing them to work together to provide advanced and specialized educational programs for students in both districts. Under the project, known as “Building Bridges,” the Baldwyn district will offer advanced career and technical courses in industrial maintenance and furniture manufacturing leading to industry-recognized certifications in these areas. The courses will be available to students in both districts. The Booneville School District will offer online Advanced Placement courses taught by Booneville High School teachers via the Internet. Booneville Superintendent Dr. Todd English said the online courses will be available not only to students in the Baldwyn District but will be offered to districts throughout the area and the entire region. He said they are currently in discussions with officials in several other districts about offering the courses to their students. The other districts will pay for the online courses, but at a rate much lower than the amount they are receiving from the state per pupil and much lower than the cost for them to add additional teachers to offer the courses themselves. “It’s a game-changer, both academically and financially,” said English. He said the courses being offered by Baldwyn create new opportunities for students aiming for careers in those areas to obtain the kind of training and credentials looked for by industry and for those students who excel in the programs to be prepared to land high-paying jobs in those industries right out of high school. English said the courses at Baldwyn, which will be taught in a new career education building to be constructed using funds from the district’s recently passed bond issue, will complement and enhance the list of courses currently offered to students through the Prentiss County Vocational-Technical Center, offering additional opportunities to students but not replacing or duplicating current vocational programs. This is the second year the districts have applied for the District of Innovation program. Last year the application was rejected due to a conflict with regulations about the amount of time students must physically be in a class for it to count for credit. English said that issue was resolved with the new application and they’re thrilled to begin working together to offer students in both districts and throughout the region new opportunities for advanced learning. The Districts of Innovation program was approved by the state legislature in 2015 and allows school districts to obtain exemptions from certain state regulations to allow them to create innovative educational programs that can serve as models for other districts throughout the state in the future.
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