Contact Us e-Edition Crossroads Magazine
After Brexit, a Trump path to victory
by Pat Buchanan
Jun 29, 2016 | 72 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Some of us have long predicted the breakup of the European Union. The Cousins appear to have just delivered the coup de grace. While Scotland and Northern Ireland voted to remain in the EU, England voted for independence. These people, with their unique history, language and culture, want to write their own laws and rule themselves. The English wish to remain who they are, and they do not want their country to become, in Theodore Roosevelt's phrase, "a polyglot boarding house" for the world. From patriots of all nations, congratulations are in order. It will all begin to unravel now, over there, and soon over here. Across Europe, tribalism, of all strains, is resurgent. Not only does the EU appear to be breaking up, countries appear about to break up. Scotland will seek a second referendum to leave the U.K. The French National Front of Marine Le Pen and the Dutch Party for Freedom both want out of the EU. As Scots seek to secede from the U.K., Catalonia seeks to secede from Spain, Veneto from Italy, and Flemish nationalists from Belgium. Ethnonationalism seems everywhere ascendant. Yet, looking back in history, is this not the way the world has been going for some centuries now? The disintegration of the EU into its component nations would follow, as Vladimir Putin helpfully points out, the dissolution of the USSR into 15 nations, and the breakup of Yugoslavia into seven. Czechoslovakia lately split in two. The Donbass seeks to secede from Ukraine. Is that so different from Transnistria splitting off from Romania, Abkhazia and South Ossetia seceding from Georgia, and Chechnya seeking separation from Russia? After World War II came the disintegration of the French and British empires and birth of dozens of new nations in Africa, Asia and the Middle East. America returned the Philippine islands to their people. The previous century saw the collapse of the Spanish Empire and birth of a score of new nations in our own hemisphere. In Xi Jinping's China and Putin's Russia, nationalism is rising, even as China seeks to repress Uighur and Tibetan separatists. People want to rule themselves, and be themselves, separate from all others. Palestinians want their own nation. Israelis want "a Jewish state." On Cyprus, Turks and Greeks seem happier apart. Kurds are fighting to secede from Turkey and Iraq, and perhaps soon from Syria and Iran. Afghanistan appears to be splintering into regions dominated by Pashtuns, Hazaras, Uzbeks and Tajiks. Eritrea has left Ethiopia. South Sudan has seceded from Khartoum. Nor is America immune to the populist sentiments surging in Europe. In Bernie Sanders' fulminations against corporate and financial elites one hears echoes of the radical leftist rhetoric in Greece and Italy against EU banking elites. And as "Brexit" swept the native-born English outside of multiracial, multiethnic, multicultural, multilingual London, populist-nationalist Donald Trump and antiestablishment Ted Cruz swept the native-born white working and middle classes in the primaries. In Britain, all the mainstream parties – Labor, Tory, Liberal Democrat, Scottish National – supported "Remain." All lost. Nigel Farage's UK Independence Party alone won. In the past six months, millions of Democrats voted for a 74-year-old socialist against the establishment choice, Hillary Clinton, as Bush-Romney-Ryan Republicanism was massively repudiated in the Republican primaries. As Trump said last week, "We got here because we switched from a policy of Americanism – focusing on what's good for America's middle class – to a policy of globalism, focusing on how to make money for large corporations who can move their wealth and workers to foreign countries all to the detriment of the American worker and the American economy." Yesterday, news arrived that in May alone, the U.S. had run a trade deficit in goods of $60 billion. This translates into an annual deficit of $720 billion in goods, or near 4 percent of our GDP wiped out by purchases of foreign-made rather than U.S.-made goods. In 40 years, we have not run a trade surplus. The most self-sufficient republic in all of history now relies for its necessities upon other nations. What might a Trumpian policy of Americanism over globalism entail? A 10 to 20 percent tariff on manufactured goods to wipe out the trade deficit in goods, with the hundreds of billions in revenue used to slash or eliminate corporate taxes in the USA. Every U.S. business would benefit. Every global company would have an incentive not only to move production here, but its headquarters here. An "America first" immigration policy would secure the border, cut legal immigration to tighten U.S. labor markets, strictly enforce U.S. laws against those breaking into our country, and get tough with businesses that make a practice of hiring people here illegally. In Europe and America, corporate, financial and political elites are increasingly disrespected and transnationalism is receding. An anti-establishment, nationalist, populist wave is surging across Europe and the USA. It is an anti-insider, anti-Clinton wave, and Trump could ride it to victory. (Daily Corinthian columnist Pat Buchanan is an American conservative political commentator, author, syndicated columnist, politician and broadcaster.)
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
Kris' birthday coming down
by Rheta Johnson
Jun 29, 2016 | 82 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
FISHTRAP HOLLOW – As soon as the heat dropped below 90 degrees one recent late afternoon – about 7 o'clock, really – I moved the CD player to the front porch, adjusted the fan just so and put my feet up on a coffee table. I played "Sunday Morning Coming Down" and "The Pilgrim" and "The Captive." My Georgia friend Sharon Thomason, author of an intimate book about country music, had reminded me that a shared musical hero, Kris Kristofferson, turned 80 in June, same month as the iconic author Larry McMurtry. It was hard to believe. Kris is the Paul Newman of songwriters, getting better as he ages and never quitting doing what he does. He has a new album out and continues to perform. I think country musicians may have an advantage over rock musicians in that they don't look ridiculous singing their songs after they reach age 60. Their songs are more sedate and involve less swivel. I have nothing against the Rolling Stones, for instance, but I no longer want to watch the sausage being made. It's different with Kris. For one thing, Kris was born old and wise. The first time I heard him sing was "Why Me, Lord?" over an eight-track player. His voice was so slow and quivery I thought the tape was dragging. That introduction began a love affair that has lasted over 40 years. And Kris did that unfair thing that certain males do. He managed to get better and better looking as the years passed by. His baby face finally matured enough to match his wise voice. When I hear what passes for country lyrics these days, I wonder if any of the new stars have ever listened to a Kris song. Or a Hank song. Not that just anybody could write like the masters, but one could aspire. One could try to learn. Kris never used gimmicky language that seems to be so in vogue these days. He told stories. Love stories full of pathos and hurt. He reached into his closet and found his cleanest dirty shirt. We could see him doing it. We could taste that beer he had for breakfast. Love, after all, is not bouncy and bright. It doesn't always come in pretty packages tied up with ribbons. It's tepid beer, not champagne. And it hurts. How could a teenager plucked from the Mickey Mouse Club and packaged as a superstar know that? No dues, no blues. I heard Kris live in concert twice. Once when he was young and I was younger. It was in the huge coliseum venue at Auburn University, and Kris and his wife Rita Coolidge were together. She was more stylish at the time and got top billing. "Rita, Rita, Rita!" the crowd demanded when Kris took the stage as the warm-up act. I remember feeling bad for Kris, who had written many of the songs Rita Coolidge sang. But it didn't seem to bother Kris, who took a swig of whiskey in front of God and everybody, and kept singing. I heard him at the Ryman six years ago, just Kris and his harmonica and guitar, singing parts or all of every song he ever knew. It was a brilliant performance, much appreciated by the audience of boomers who knew all the words. I figured it was some sort of farewell tour, but it wasn't. He's kept right on turning, for the better or the worse, still searching for a shrine he's never found. Happy birthday, Kris. (To find out more about Daily Corinthian columnist Rheta Grimsley Johnson and her books, visit www.rhetagrimsleyjohnsonbooks.com.)
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
The fraud goes on
by Thomas Sowell
Jun 29, 2016 | 65 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Last week the Supreme Court of the United States voted that President Obama exceeded his authority when he granted exemptions from the immigration laws passed by Congress. But the Supreme Court also exceeded its own authority by granting the University of Texas an exemption from the Constitution's requirement of "equal protection of the laws," by voting that racial preferences for student admissions were legal. Supreme Court decisions in affirmative action cases are the longest running fraud since the 1896 decision upholding racial segregation laws in the Jim Crow South, on grounds that "separate but equal" facilities were consistent with the Constitution. Everybody knew that those facilities were separate but by no means equal. Nevertheless, this charade lasted until 1954. The Supreme Court's affirmative action cases have now lasted since 1974 when, in the case of "DeFunis v. Odegaard," the Court voted 5 to 4 that this particular case was moot, which spared the justices from having to vote on its merits. While the 1896 "separate but equal" decision lasted 58 years, the Supreme Court's affirmative action cases have now had 42 years of evasion, sophistry and fraud, with no end in sight. One sign of the erosion of principles over the years is that even one of the Court's most liberal judicial activists, Justice William O. Douglas, could not stomach affirmative action in 1974, and voted to condemn it, rather than declare the issue moot. But now, in 2016, the supposedly conservative Justice Anthony Kennedy voted to uphold the University of Texas' racial preferences. Perhaps the atmosphere inside the Washington Beltway wears down opposition to affirmative action, much as water can eventually wear down rock and create the Grand Canyon. We have heard much this year about the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of the great Justice Antonin Scalia -- and rightly so. But there are two vacancies on the Supreme Court. The other vacancy is Anthony Kennedy. The human tragedy, amid all the legal evasions and frauds is that, while many laws and policies sacrifice some people for the sake of other people, affirmative action manages to harm blacks, whites, Asians and others, even if in different ways. Students who are kept out of a college because other students are admitted instead, under racial quotas, obviously lose opportunities they would otherwise have had. But minority students admitted to institutions whose academic standards they do not meet are all too often needlessly turned into failures, even when they have the prerequisites for success in some other institution whose normal standards they do meet. When black students who scored at the 90th percentile in math were admitted to M.I.T., where the other students scored at the 99th percentile, a significant number of black students failed to graduate there, even though they could have graduated with honors at most other academic institutions. We do not have so many students with that kind of ability that we can afford to sacrifice them on the altar to political correctness. Such negative consequences of mismatching minority students with institutions, for the sake of racial body count, have been documented in a number of studies, most notably "Mismatch," a book by Richard Sander and Stuart Taylor, Jr., whose sub-title is: "How Affirmative Action Hurts Students It's Intended to Help, and Why Universities Won't Admit It." When racial preferences in student admissions in the University of California system were banned, the number of black and Hispanic students in the system declined slightly, but the number actually graduating rose substantially. So did the number graduating with degrees in tough subjects like math, science and engineering. But hard facts carry no such weight among politicians as magic words like "diversity" -- a word repeated endlessly, without one speck of evidence to back up its sweeping claims of benefits. It too is part of the Supreme Court fraud, going back to a 1978 decision that seemingly banned racial quotas -- unless the word "diversity" was used instead of "quotas." Seeming to ban racial preferences, while letting them continue under another name, was clever politically. But the last thing we need in Washington are nine more politicians, wearing judicial robes. (Daily Corinthian columnist Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305. His website is www.tsowell.com.)
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
Pat Summitt, winningest D1 coach, dies

by The Associated Press
Jun 28, 2016 | 81 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -- Pat Summitt put women's basketball on her back, breaking down barriers with her indomitable spirit and demanding respect for female athletes on her way to becoming the winningest coach in Division I college basketball history. The woman who lifted the sport to national prominence staring down players and officials with her icy glare will be remembered for far more than the impressive numbers she piled up over 38 seasons, including eight national titles. Summitt, 64, died peacefully Tuesday morning at Sherrill Hill Senior Living in Knoxville surrounded by those who loved her most, according to her son, Tyler. Her death, five years and two months after being diagnosed with early onset dementia, Alzheimer's type, resulted in an outpouring of reactions from the president to people who never played for Summitt. "Pat started playing college hoops before Title IX and started coaching before the NCAA recognized women's basketball as a sport," President Obama said. "When she took the helm at Tennessee as a 22-year-old, she had to wash her players' uniforms; by the time Pat stepped down as the Lady Vols' head coach, her teams wore eight championship rings and had cut down nets in sold-out stadiums." Obama added Summitt's Hall of Fame career tells of the historic progress toward equality in American athletics the coach helped advance. "Her legacy, however, is measured much more by the generations of young women and men who admired Pat's intense competitiveness and character, and as a result found in themselves the confidence to practice hard, play harder, and live with courage on and off the court," Obama said. Summitt helped grow college women's basketball as her Lady Vols dominated the sport in the late 1980s and 1990s, winning six titles in 12 years. Tennessee — the only school she coached — won NCAA titles in 1987, 1989, 1991, 1996-98 and 2007-08. Summitt had a career record of 1,098-208 in 38 seasons, plus 18 NCAA Final Four appearances. Former Lady Vols forward Candace Parker said Summitt's impact went way beyond Knoxville. "She's changed the way women's basketball is played," Parker said. "She's changed the nature of women's basketball." Summitt announced in 2011 at age 59 that she'd been diagnosed with early onset dementia. She coached one more season before stepping down. At her retirement, Summitt's eight national titles ranked behind the 10 won by former UCLA men's coach John Wooden. UConn coach Geno Auriemma passed Summitt after she retired. When she stepped down, Summitt called her coaching career a "great ride." Tyler Summitt said Tuesday that his mother had battled her toughest opponent with fierce determination. "Even though it's incredibly difficult to come to terms that she is no longer with us, we can all find peace in knowing she no longer carries the heavy burden of this disease," Tyler Summitt said in a statement. Peyton Manning, who sought Summitt's advice about returning to Tennessee for his senior season or going to the NFL, said it would have been a great experience to play for her. "She could have coached any team, any sport, men's or women's. It wouldn't have mattered because Pat could flat out coach," Manning said in a statement. "I will miss her dearly, and I am honored to call her my friend. My thoughts and prayers are with Tyler and their entire family." Summitt was a tough taskmaster with a frosty glower that could strike the fear of failure in her players. She punished one team that stayed up partying before an early morning practice by running them until they vomited. She even placed garbage cans in the gym so they'd have somewhere to be sick. Nevertheless, she enjoyed such an intimate relationship with her players that they called her "Pat." Summitt never had a losing record and her teams never missed the NCAA Tournament. She began her coaching career at Tennessee in the 1974-75 season, when her team finished 16-8. She became the first millionaire coach in women's basketball in 2006 and was paid $1.5 million in her final season in 2011-12. Summitt won 16 Southeastern Conference regular season titles, as well as 16 conference tournament titles. She was an eight-time SEC coach of the year and seven-time NCAA coach of the year. She also coached the U.S. women's Olympic team to the 1984 gold medal. Her greatest adversary on the court was Auriemma. The two teams played 22 times from 1995-2007. Summitt ended the series after the 2007 season. "Pat set the standard for which programs like ours dreamed of achieving, both on and off the court," Auriemma said. "Our sport reached new heights thanks to her success, which came from an incomparable work ethic and a larger than life, yet, compassionate personality." In 1999, Summitt was inducted as part of the inaugural class of the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame. She made the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame a year later. She also received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. Summitt was such a competitor that she refused to let a pilot land in Virginia when she went into labor while on a recruiting trip in 1990. Virginia had beaten her Lady Vols a few months earlier, preventing them from playing for a national title on their home floor. But it was only in 2012 when being honored with the Arthur Ashe Courage Award that Summitt shared she had six miscarriages before giving birth to her son, Tyler. Born June 14, 1952, in Henrietta, Tennessee, Summitt graduated from Cheatham County Central High School just west of Nashville. She played college basketball at the University of Tennessee at Martin where she received her bachelor's degree in physical education. She was the co-captain of the 1976 U.S. Olympic team, which won the silver medal. After playing at UT Martin, she was hired as a graduate assistant at Tennessee and took over when the previous head coach left. Summitt detailed her battle with dementia in a memoir, "Sum It Up," released in March 2013 and co-written with Sally Jenkins. "It's hard to pinpoint the exact day that I first noticed something wrong," Summitt wrote. "Over the course of a year, from 2010 to 2011, I began to experience a troubling series of lapses. I had to ask people to remind me of the same things, over and over. I'd ask three times in the space of an hour, 'What time is my meeting again?' - and then be late." Summitt started a foundation in her name to fight Alzheimer's in 2011 that has raised millions of dollars. After she retired, Summitt was given the title head coach emeritus at Tennessee. She had been cutting back her public appearances, coming to a handful of Tennessee games this past season and occasionally also traveled to watch her son Tyler coach at Louisiana Tech. Earlier this year, Summitt moved out of her home into an upscale retirement resort. She married R.B. Summitt in 1980 and filed for divorce in 2007. Summitt is survived by her mother, Hazel Albright Head; son, Tyler; sister, Linda; brothers, Tommy, Charles and Kenneth. Tyler Summitt said a private funeral and burial will be held in Middle Tennessee and asked that the family's privacy be respected. A public memorial service will be held July 14 at Thompson-Boling Arena.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
CWS, swimming on collision course
by The Associated Press
Jun 28, 2016 | 84 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
OMAHA, Neb. --The College World Series and U.S. swimming trials have coexisted nicely this week. That might not be the case if Omaha hosts the trials again in 2020. The events are being held across the street from each other in downtown Omaha, with the trials at the CenturyLink Center and the CWS at TD Ameritrade Park. Trials races and CWS games went head-to-head Monday and Tuesday and could again on Wednesday. USA Swimming executive director Chuck Wielgus said last week that with the Tokyo Olympics starting July 24, 2020, the trials would start on or about June 14 if the same schedule as this year was used. The 2020 CWS is scheduled to start June 13. The events could cause some issues if held simultaneously, like the demand for hotel rooms with eight CWS teams in town along with swimmers, family and friends. The conflict was minimal this year because only four teams remained in the CWS when trials participants began arriving, and only two teams were left when the trials started. Ron Prettyman, the managing director of championships and alliances for the NCAA, said the organization wants to work with USA Swimming, but there is no wiggle room on dates for the CWS. "It is not likely in the slightest way that we're going to be adjusting our championship," Prettyman said. "It's so calculated with regionals and super regionals and when things start and finish. We're the last championship the NCAA has, so we can't go earlier, and we really don't want to go later because we're concerned about time demands for student-athletes and so on. These kids are ready to be kids and enjoy their summer, too. "I don't know what the flexibility is for swimming. If they could push it back two days, that would be ideal." The trials are being held for the third straight time in Omaha, and city officials have said they want to host the trials again. This year's trials are sold out, with more than 14,000 attending each session. When CWS games and trials competition run simultaneously, a combined 35,000 people attend the events in a compact area on the north side of downtown.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet